Research Portal

Research Portal profiles world leading research excellence
at the Queen's University of Belfast

Publications
  • Bowel cancer breakthrough may benefit thousands of patients 17 Jul, 2014 Researchers at Queen’s University have made a significant breakthrough that may benefit patients with bowel cancer. Dr Sandra van Schaeybroeck and her team have discovered how two genes cause bowel cancer cells to become resistant to treatments used against the disease. The research, which was funded by Cancer Research UK, was published this month in the prestigious international journal Cell Reports. The activity of the two genes, called MEK and MET, was uncovered when the researchers looked at all the different pathways and interactions taking place in bowel cancer cells. Dr van Schaeybroeck and her group found that these bowel cancers switch on a survival mechanism when they are treated with drugs that target faulty MEK genes. But when the researchers added drugs that also block the MET gene, the bowel cancer cells died. The team...)
  • Emmy nomination for Hillsborough documentary 11 Jul, 2014 A documentary based on long-term research by a Queen’s University Professor has been nominated for an Emmy. Short-listed for Exceptional Merit in Documentary Film-making, the two-hour ESPN/BBC documentary, Hillsborough, is derived from Professor Phil Scraton’s research previously published in two influential reports on the disaster and his book Hillsborough: The Truth. Professor Scraton led the research for the Hillsborough Independent Panel and was primary author of its report that led to new inquests into the deaths of the 96 men, women and children, the ongoing Independent Police Complaints Commission investigation, and a full criminal inquiry into all the authorities involved. The documentary reflects Professor Scraton’s in depth work into the context, circumstances and aftermath of the disaster, using archival mater...)
  • Queen’s scientists exhibit the ‘designer liquids’ turning industry green 02 Jul, 2014 A groundbreaking process for removing toxic mercury from natural gas – using a new class of fluids called ionic liquids - is just one of the exciting new pieces of research to be showcased by Queen’s University Belfast at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition. Researchers from QUILL – the Queen’s University Ionic Liquid Laboratories – will display their latest, award-winning findings into making the chemical industry more environmentally friendly at the exhibition, which opens to the public tomorrow, July 1, at Royal Society headquarters in central London. On average 12,000 members of the public, including families and school-groups, visit the exhibition every year. This year’s show runs from July 1-6, and admission is free. QUILL is the only exhibitor from Northern Ireland at this year...)
  • Queen’s scientist makes major cystic fibrosis breakthrough 02 Jul, 2014 A Queen’s University doctor has played a key role in a major breakthrough to change the lives of cystic fibrosis sufferers. Queen’s University’s Professor Stuart Elborn, an international authority in respiratory medicine, with colleagues from the United States and Australia have led pivotal studies of a new treatment for people with Cystic Fibrosis. The combination therapy, developed by Vertex (a Boston, USA company), improves lung function and reduces hospitalisations for patients with the most common type of cystic fibrosis. Two Phase 3 studies of the drugs ivacaftor and lumacaftor, which included over 1,100 patients worldwide, built on previous studies of ivacaftor in patients with G551D and other related mutations.  Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the underlying causes of cystic fibrosis rather than just it...)
  • Queen’s scientists exhibit the ‘designer liquids’ turning industry green 30 Jun, 2014 A groundbreaking process for removing toxic mercury from natural gas – using a new class of fluids called ionic liquids - is just one of the exciting new pieces of research to be showcased by Queen’s University Belfast at the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition. Researchers from QUILL – the Queen’s University Ionic Liquid Laboratories – will display their latest, award-winning findings into making the chemical industry more environmentally friendly at the exhibition, which opens to the public tomorrow, July 1, at Royal Society headquarters in central London. On average 12,000 members of the public, including families and school-groups, visit the exhibition every year. This year’s show runs from July 1-6, and admission is free. QUILL is the only exhibitor from Northern Ireland at this year...)
  • Queen’s scientist makes major cystic fibrosis breakthrough 25 Jun, 2014 A Queen’s University doctor has played a key role in a major breakthrough to change the lives of cystic fibrosis sufferers. Queen’s University’s Professor Stuart Elborn, an international authority in respiratory medicine, with colleagues from the United States and Australia have led pivotal studies of a new treatment for people with Cystic Fibrosis. The combination therapy, developed by Vertex (a Boston, USA company), improves lung function and reduces hospitalisations for patients with the most common type of cystic fibrosis. Two Phase 3 studies of the drugs ivacaftor and lumacaftor, which included over 1,100 patients worldwide, built on previous studies of ivacaftor in patients with G551D and other related mutations.  Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the underlying causes of cystic fibrosis rather than just it...)
  • Queen’s seeks volunteers wanting to enjoy a taste of the Mediterranean 24 Jun, 2014 Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast are calling for volunteers to take part in a new study to find out how best to support people in adopting a Mediterranean-style diet and thereby changing their eating habits. Scientists at Queen’s Centre for Public Health are looking for 75 people to take part in the one-year study. Participants must be aged 40 or over and be overweight, but generally in good health with no history of diabetes or heart disease. The TEAM-MED (Trial to Encourage Adoption and Maintenance of a Mediterranean Diet) study aims to determine whether different ways of giving dietary advice and support have an impact on people’s ability to change their eating habits. Professor Jayne Woodside from Queen’s Centre for Public Health said: “As we all know, changing our diet is easier said than done. ...)
  • Ireland’s smallest mammals under threat from white-toothed invaders 23 Jun, 2014 An invading species of shrew first discovered in Ireland in the pellets of barn owls and kestrels in 2007 by researchers at Queen’s University Belfast is spreading across the landscape at a rate of more than five kilometres a year, according to findings published (today, 23 June 2014) in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. Scientists from Queen’s and University College Dublin believe that the invading species, the greater white-toothed shrew could colonize field boundaries and abandoned farmland across the entire island by 2050 and this could lead to the disappearance of the pygmy shrew  which has been on the island for thousands of years.  Dr Allan McDevitt, University College Dublin, the lead author of the paper, says that ‘the invading population of the greater white-toothed shrew currently covers an area of 7,...)
  • Queen’s celebrates women who ‘engineer’ success 18 Jun, 2014 The woman who advises Jenson Button on how to get the best performance from his McLaren Formula One car is one of a number of female engineers to be featured in an exhibition celebrating Women In Engineering Day at Queen’s University on 23 June. Bernadette Collins from Enniskillen graduated from Queen’s in 2009 and is now a Performance Engineer with McLaren Formula One racing team. She will feature in a poster exhibition highlighting Queen’s female staff and graduates who are making their mark on engineering in Northern Ireland and around the world. Other women featured in the exhibition include Lecturer Dr Danielle Soban, whose life-long love of planes led her to a career in aircraft design and a passion for mentoring young women in aerospace. Graduates include Marie Butterfield whose Queen’s degree opened the doo...)
  • Queen's researchers helping to make the 'big C' smaller 11 Jun, 2014 The scientist behind the development of a new drug to treat ovarian cancer will showcase her work at a free public event at Queen's University this evening (Wednesday 11 June). Professor Tracy Robson is one of four of Queen's world-class cancer researchers who will provide an insight into their work and its impact on cancer patients in Northern Ireland. Cancer Research: Advancing Patient Care will take place at Riddel Hall, Stranmillis Road, this evening (Wednesday 11 June) from 5.30pm-7.30pm. It will feature scientists and clinicians from Queen’s Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences whose work is helping develop new ways to diagnose and treat cancer. Members of the public are invited to drop-in for a chat with those working in cancer nursing, palliative care, drug discovery and the running of clinical trials, and to hear p...)