Research Portal

Research Portal profiles world leading research excellence
at the Queen's University of Belfast

Publications
  • Government Supports Queen’s Professor's Recommendations For A National Food Crime Prevention Framework 18 Sep, 2014 The final report into the integrity and authenticity of UK food supply chain, which has been led by Professor Chris Elliott, Director of the Global Institute for Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast, has been published today.    It makes a number of recommendations to government about how to ensure consumers can be fully confident about the quality of their food.   Following last year’s horse meat incident, Professor Chris Elliott was asked by the Secretaries of State for Defra and the Department of Health to lead a review into the integrity and assurance of food supply networks and to make recommendations on what could be done to protect UK consumers from food fraud.   Professor Elliott has published over 270 papers in the field of detection and control of chemical contaminants in agri-food commodit...)
  • Queen’s University to transform how research discoveries are translated into real benefits for patients 10 Sep, 2014 Scientists from Queen’s University Belfast are in Brussels today to launch a ground-breaking initiative which could radically improve how research discoveries are translated into real benefits for patients across Europe. Endorsed by all three of Northern Ireland’s Members of European Parliament (MEPs), the initiative is led by Professor Mark Lawler, Chair in Translational Cancer Genomics at Queen’s Centre of Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Known as the Roadmap for Personalised Medicine in Europe, the initiative is a collaboration involving patients, doctors and scientists, as well as the pharmaceutical and biotech industries. It is aiming to make personalised medicine available to all European patients. Professor Lawler, said: “In many diseases, we have tended to use a ‘one size fits all’ appr...)
  • Public invited to discuss parading and dealing with the past at Queen’s 09 Sep, 2014 Parading, dealing with the past and shared education are among the issues members of the public are being invited to discuss at an event at Queen’s University next week. The event is part of discussions on a shared future in Northern Ireland which is being led by the Stormont Executive. It has established a consultation into sectarianism, social division and community relations, with a deadline of 26 September 2014 for individual submissions from members of the public. Officially known as the Inquiry Into Building a United Community, the process is being chaired by Mike Nesbitt MLA. To encourage submissions and support debate on these matters, the Institute for the Study of Conflict Transformation and Social Justice (ISCTSJ) at Queen’s is hosting a ‘Civic Conversation’ on 17 September, featuring talks by academics ...)
  • Over a quarter of people in Northern Ireland live with ‘multiple deprivation’ 04 Sep, 2014 More than a quarter (26 per cent) of adults in Northern Ireland live with ‘multiple deprivation’, (lacking three or more basic necessities), and this figure increases among those who experienced violent events during the ‘Troubles’, according to research from Queen’s University Belfast. Among those who lost a close friend during the ‘Troubles’, the multiple deprivation rate rose to 36 per cent. Multiple deprivation means that people live with three or more deprivations, such as lack of food, heating or clothing, due to lack of money. The figures are included in the largest study of poverty and deprivation ever conducted in the UK, The Poverty and Social Exclusion in the United Kingdom (PSE) project, led by the University of Bristol and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.&...)
  • Over a quarter of people in Northern Ireland live with ‘multiple deprivation’ 25 Aug, 2014 More than a quarter (26 per cent) of adults in Northern Ireland live with ‘multiple deprivation’, (lacking three or more basic necessities), and this figure increases among those who experienced violent events during the ‘Troubles’, according to research from Queen’s University Belfast. Among those who lost a close friend during the ‘Troubles’, the multiple deprivation rate rose to 36 per cent. Multiple deprivation means that people live with three or more deprivations, such as lack of food, heating or clothing, due to lack of money. The figures are included in the largest study of poverty and deprivation ever conducted in the UK, The Poverty and Social Exclusion in the United Kingdom (PSE) project, led by the University of Bristol and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.&...)
  • Queen’s and NASA join forces in major international investigation into ‘solar flares’ 19 Aug, 2014 A major new collaboration between the Astrophysics Research Centre (ARC) at Queen’s University Belfast and American space agency NASA is set to investigate ‘solar flares’ and their potential to cause disruption here on Earth. Essentially explosions in the Sun’s atmosphere, solar flares result in significant increases in ultra-violet radiation. While the physics behind this phenomenon is still unknown, the increased UV radiation and the associated solar storms can disrupt radio communication and GPS, with potentially dangerous knock-on effects for a range of activities including air-traffic control and search-and-rescue missions. Solar storms can also be associated with the visual spectacle known as the Northern Lights which is caused by charged particles streaming from the Sun. NASA, in conjunction with the Ca...)
  • Queen’s scientists in hospital superbugs breakthrough 18 Aug, 2014 Scientists at Queen’s University Belfast have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs. The team from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s have developed the first innovative antibacterial gel that acts to kill Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E.coli using natural proteins. The gels have the ability to break down the thick jelly-like coating, known as biofilms, which cover bacteria making them highly resistant to current therapies, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Dr Garry Laverty, from the School of Pharmacy at Queen’s University, and lead researcher, said: “When bacteria attach to surfaces, including medical implants such as hip replacements and catheters, they produce a jelly-like substance called the biofilm. This protective layer is almost impossible for curre...)
  • Boost for cancer prevention research 05 Aug, 2014 Queen’s University scientists are helping to spearhead a new £6 million initiative to find better ways to prevent cancer. The new initiative, led by Cancer Research UK with matching investment from the BUPA Foundation, aims to support cutting-edge research to find better ways to prevent cancer. It is estimated that more than four in ten cancer cases could be prevented by lifestyle changes, such as not smoking, keeping a healthy body weight, cutting back on alcohol, eating a healthy diet, keeping active and staying safe in the sun. Professor Frank Kee, who directs the UKCRC Centre of Excellence for Public Health Research in Northern Ireland at Queen’s University, has been invited to join the International Advisory Board (IAB) of the new Cancer Prevention Science Initiative. Professor Kee, from the School of Medicine, Denti...)
  • Queen’s University awarded £500,000 to tackle global food fraud 04 Aug, 2014 Scientists at Queen’s University Belfast have received £500,000 to investigate global food fraud and help prevent criminal activity within the industry. The two year project will investigate vulnerabilities in food supply chains and evaluate effective ways to improve consumer trust in food and its producers. Queen’s was awarded one of only five grants from the ‘Understanding the Challenges of the Food System’ call by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Food Standards Agency, under the Global Food Security programme. Professor Chris Elliott and Dr Moira Dean from the Queen’s Institute for Global Food Security and their colleagues from the School of Law & Institute for Study of Conflict Transformation, in collaboration with Dr John Spink from Michigan State University will undertake...)
  • Queen’s scientist to help find new options to treat aggressive breast cancers 01 Aug, 2014 A Queen’s University scientist has been awarded a grant worth around £100,000 by research charity Breast Cancer Campaign to investigate if the protein ‘PIN1’ could be used to provide new options to treat patients with more aggressive forms of breast cancer. 50,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with breast cancer each year on average and 12,000 women sadly die from the disease each year on average. Around 15 per cent of breast cancers are found to be ‘triple-negative’- a type of breast cancer that tends to be more aggressive and has limited treatment options.  In some cases of triple-negative breast cancer (and the related ‘basal-like’ breast cancer), a protein called BRCA1 does not work normally. Dr Niamh O’Brien, from the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology at Queen’...)