Suzel Reily

Phone: +44 (0)28 9097 5204

For media contact email comms.office@qub.ac.uk
or call +44(0)2890 973091.

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Interests

Suzel Reily completed her doctoral degree in Social Anthropology in 1990 at the University of Sao Paulo. During her studies she spent a year working with the late Professor John Blacking at Queen's University Belfast. Upon defending her PhD she returned to Belfast for a research fellowship which would later become a full-time permanent lectureship in 1991. She acted as Chair for the British Forum for Ethnomusicology (2000-2003) and for the Society for Ethnomusicology Council (2003 - 2005). She has just returned from the University of Chicago where she held a Tinker Visiting Professorship (2007). Dr Reily acted as co-editor of the British Journal for Ethnomusicology (1998-2001) and since 2003 she has been acting as website reviews editor for the Yearbook of Traditional Music. Between 2002 and 2003, she held an ESRC research grant and is currently completing a monograph based on this material which addresses the musical life of a small former mining town in Minas Gerais, Brazil, from the colonial period to the present.

Particulars

Relevant Website Addresses

Music Making in Belfast: www.qub.ac.uk/sa-old/resources/Belfast_Project/index.html
Venda Girls' Initiation Schools: http://www.qub.ac.uk/VendaGirls/index.html
Holy Week Celebrations in Brazil: www.qub.ac.uk/sa-old/resources/HolyWeek/index.html

Research Statement

Suzel Reily has been conducting research on Brazilian musics since the early 1980s. Her main focus has been the musical traditions of southeastern popular catholicism, the topic of her book Voices of the Magi (Chicago 2002), but she has also written about various popular styles, such as bossa nova and musica sertaneja as well as issues pertaining to the development of ethnomusicological research in Brazil, a central concern of her edited volume Brazilian Musics, Brazilian Identities (BJE 2000). She is also interested in the ways ethnomusicologists and anthropologists might use hypermedia, and she has been involved in the construction of a website based on John Blacking's ethnographic material, titled , while also overseeing the student-led Music Making in Belfast Project. Her most recent hypermedia venture involved the representation of the Holy Week celebrations in Campanha, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

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Contribution to conference papers, events and activities

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