National identification and anti-immigrant prejudice: Individual and contextual effects of national definitions

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      National identification and anti-immigrant prejudice: Individual and contextual effects of national definitions. / Pehrson, Samuel; Vignoles, V.; Brown, R.

      In: Social Psychology Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 24-38.

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      Pehrson, Samuel; Vignoles, V.; Brown, R. / National identification and anti-immigrant prejudice: Individual and contextual effects of national definitions.

      In: Social Psychology Quarterly, Vol. 72, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 24-38.

      Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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      @article{0fbc229771954a8493d3271383802999,
      title = "National identification and anti-immigrant prejudice: Individual and contextual effects of national definitions",
      abstract = "In this study, we examined the relationship between national identification and anti-immigrant prejudice in a multilevel analysis of ISSP survey data from 37,030 individuals in 31 countries. We argue that this relationship depends on how national groups are defined by their members. Across the 31 national samples, the correlation between national identification and prejudice ranged from weakly negative (-.06) to moderately positive (.37). The relationship was significantly stronger in countries where people on average endorsed a definition of national belonging based on language, and weaker where people on average defined the nation in terms of citizenship. These effects occurred at a national rather than individual level, supporting an explanation in terms of the construction of nationality that prevails in a given context. Endorsement of the ancestry-based criteria for nationality was positively associated with prejudice, but only at the individual level.",
      author = "Samuel Pehrson and V. Vignoles and R. Brown",
      year = "2009",
      month = "3",
      doi = "10.1177/019027250907200104",
      volume = "72",
      pages = "24--38",
      journal = "Social Psychology Quarterly",
      issn = "0190-2725",
      publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
      number = "1",

      }

      RIS

      TY - JOUR

      T1 - National identification and anti-immigrant prejudice: Individual and contextual effects of national definitions

      AU - Pehrson,Samuel

      AU - Vignoles,V.

      AU - Brown,R.

      PY - 2009/3

      Y1 - 2009/3

      N2 - In this study, we examined the relationship between national identification and anti-immigrant prejudice in a multilevel analysis of ISSP survey data from 37,030 individuals in 31 countries. We argue that this relationship depends on how national groups are defined by their members. Across the 31 national samples, the correlation between national identification and prejudice ranged from weakly negative (-.06) to moderately positive (.37). The relationship was significantly stronger in countries where people on average endorsed a definition of national belonging based on language, and weaker where people on average defined the nation in terms of citizenship. These effects occurred at a national rather than individual level, supporting an explanation in terms of the construction of nationality that prevails in a given context. Endorsement of the ancestry-based criteria for nationality was positively associated with prejudice, but only at the individual level.

      AB - In this study, we examined the relationship between national identification and anti-immigrant prejudice in a multilevel analysis of ISSP survey data from 37,030 individuals in 31 countries. We argue that this relationship depends on how national groups are defined by their members. Across the 31 national samples, the correlation between national identification and prejudice ranged from weakly negative (-.06) to moderately positive (.37). The relationship was significantly stronger in countries where people on average endorsed a definition of national belonging based on language, and weaker where people on average defined the nation in terms of citizenship. These effects occurred at a national rather than individual level, supporting an explanation in terms of the construction of nationality that prevails in a given context. Endorsement of the ancestry-based criteria for nationality was positively associated with prejudice, but only at the individual level.

      U2 - 10.1177/019027250907200104

      DO - 10.1177/019027250907200104

      M3 - Article

      VL - 72

      SP - 24

      EP - 38

      JO - Social Psychology Quarterly

      T2 - Social Psychology Quarterly

      JF - Social Psychology Quarterly

      SN - 0190-2725

      IS - 1

      ER -

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