Diarmuid Coughlan

McFerran, E. (Host), O'Neill, C. (Host), Nga Nguyen (Host), Heron, L. (Host)

Activity: Hosting a visitor typesHosting an academic visitor

Description

Diarmuid Coughlan is a Research Associate in Health Economics at the Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University. Previously, he was a Cancer Prevention Fellow at the National Cancer Institute and his PhD was in the field of Cancer Survivorship.Diarmuid will present economics work that follows on from a recent article published in JAMA Network Open on mortality that featured in The New York Times and the Guardian, which is in the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric.Analysis of surveys on leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), Body Mass Index (BMI) and dietary intake often have a number of options available to explore findings. In this seminar, he will address the options available to analyse the 1995-1996 US NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study (lifestyle survey data) linked to Medicare claims (1999-2008) (healthcare costs). The analytical sample under study (N=21,750), retrospectively self-reported their LTPA and BMI at discrete time points, alongside their current dietary intake (using variables such as daily calorie intake, total number of fruit & vegetable servings & percentage fat from diet). In this seminar, he will present life-course trajectory models for LTPA and BMI association with later life healthcare costs. In terms of dietary intake, he will consider a range of regression-based analyses on different dietary variable classifications, such as categories, quintiles and adherence to dietary guideline recommendations. This will explore the association, if any, with healthcare costs. This is likely to be informative to economic studies of dietary interventions.
Period02 May 2019
Visiting fromNewcastle University (United Kingdom)
Visitor degreePhD
BioMALE
Degree of RecognitionNational

Keywords

  • Physical Activity
  • Medicare
  • Healthcare costs
  • Health economics
  • life-course trajectory
  • NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study