YOUNG PEOPLE’S EXPERIENCES OF PSNI STOP AND SEARCH POWERS DIFFER ACROSS SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS LINES

Press/Media: Research

Description

A new report from researchers at Queen’s has found that there are significant attitudinal differences and direct experiences towards the PSNI and their use of stop and search powers from 16 year-olds across social and religious lines. 

Dr John Topping and Dr Dirk Schubotz, from the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work at Queen’s co-authored the report entitled: ‘The usual suspects’?: Young people’s experiences of police stop and search powers in Northern Ireland’ which was launched today (Wednesday, 23 May) as part of ARK’s 2017 Young Life and Times (YLT) and Kids’ Life and Times (KLT) surveys at Queen’s University.

Period23 May 2018

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • TitleYOUNG PEOPLE’S EXPERIENCES OF PSNI STOP AND SEARCH POWERS DIFFER ACROSS SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS LINES
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date23/05/2018
    DescriptionA new report from researchers at Queen’s has found that there are significant attitudinal differences and direct experiences towards the PSNI and their use of stop and search powers from 16 year-olds across social and religious lines.

    Dr John Topping and Dr Dirk Schubotz, from the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work at Queen’s co-authored the report entitled: ‘The usual suspects’?: Young people’s experiences of police stop and search powers in Northern Ireland’ which was launched today (Wednesday, 23 May) as part of ARK’s 2017 Young Life and Times (YLT) and Kids’ Life and Times (KLT) surveys at Queen’s University.
    Producer/AuthorQUB
    URLwww.qub.ac.uk/News/Allnews/YoungpeoplesexperiencesofPSNIstopandsearchpowersdifferacrosssocialandreligiouslines.html
    PersonsJohn Topping, Dirk Schubotz

Keywords

  • Police service of Northern Ireland
  • stop and search
  • police powers
  • children's rights