20202024

Research activity per year

Personal profile

Research Focus

Allely Albert is a Lecturer in Criminology at the School of Social Sciences, Education and Social Work and a Legacy Fellow at the Mitchell Institute.

Her research broadly focuses on community-based approaches to safety, justice, and peacebuilding. Allely's current research explores 'everyday security' in communities across the Island of Ireland, highlighting local agency and bottom-up contributions to safety landscapes. Her past research has examined ex-prisoner involvement in community-based restorative justice efforts in Northern Ireland and the United States, analysing the impact of ex-prisoner leadership on the micro-dynamics of restorative processes and the mechanisms involved in wider societal peacebuilding.

Originally from California, Allely has been involved in justice and peacebuilding mechanisms in a wide variety of settings and systems. She holds multiple certifications related to restorative justice, including certifications in mediation, victim-offender dialogue, and restorative practice, and has served as an accredited practitioner at a leading restorative justice organisation in Northern Ireland.

Allely earned her PhD in Law from Queen's University Belfast, where she was the recipient of a Postgraduate Research Studentship, and additionally holds an MA in Conflict Transformation and Social Justice.

Research Interests

Criminology, Restorative Justice, Lived Experience, Community-Based Approaches, Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, Prisoner Re-entry, Informal Policing, Human Rights

Expertise related to UN Sustainable Development Goals

In 2015, UN member states agreed to 17 global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. This person’s work contributes towards the following SDG(s):

  • SDG 16 - Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

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Collaborations and top research areas from the last five years

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