3D printed carbon black-poly lactic acid/copper (CB-PLA/Cu) sensor for improved sustainability in monitoring photocatalytic hydrogen peroxide evolution

Pádraig McDonagh, Nathan Skillen, Peter K.J. Robertson, Matthew McCole, Denis McCrudden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
39 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

As the photocatalytic generation of hydrogen peroxide continues to gather increasing interest, there is a significant need to introduce more sustainable methods to monitor the reaction process. The fabrication of low-cost sustainable electrochemical sensors offers an enticing alternative to the current standard methods. This study reports the first use of an electrochemical sensor to monitor such a process. A highly reproducible 3D printed carbon black-poly lactic acid/copper sensor with an extremely low fabrication cost of €0.012 was employed to accurately monitor the photocatalytic evolution of hydrogen peroxide. The accuracy was confirmed through strong correlation with a standard fluorescence spectroscopic method. The sensor displayed limit of detection and limit of quantification values of 0.24µM and 0.79µM respectively, and a sensitivity of 217µAmM-1 cm2, while also showing strong selectivity towards hydrogen peroxide in the presence of potential interfering species. Moreover, the electrocatalytic surface was capable of ≥3x regeneration without significant loss in activity bringing a ≥75% decrease in analysis cost and a significant reduction in potential waste material. This novel approach to monitoring the photocatalytic evolution of hydrogen peroxide presents as a more economical and sustainable alternative to current methods.
Original languageEnglish
Article number111123
JournalJournal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
Volume11
Issue number6
Early online date04 Oct 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

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