A combined transient and computational study of the dissociation of N(2)O on platinum catalysts

R Burch*, ST Daniells, JP Breen, P Hu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The energetics of the low-temperature adsorption and decomposition of nitrous oxide, N(2)O, on flat and stepped platinum surfaces were calculated using density-functional theory (DFT). The results show that the preferred adsorption site for N(2)O is an atop site, bound upright via the terminal nitrogen. The molecule is only weakly chemisorbed to the platinum surface. The decomposition barriers on flat (I 11) surfaces and stepped (211) surfaces are similar. While the barrier for N(2)O dissociation is relatively small, the surface rapidly becomes poisoned by adsorbed oxygen. These findings are supported by experimental results of pulsed N(2)O decomposition with 5% Pt/SiO(2) and bismuth-modified Pt/C catalysts. At low temperature, decomposition occurs but self-poisoning by O((ads)) prevents further decomposition. At higher temperatures some desorption Of O(2) is observed, allowing continued catalytic activity. The study with bismuth-modified Pt/C catalysts showed that, although the activation barriers calculated for both terraces and steps were similar, the actual rate was different for the two surfaces. Steps were found experimentally to be more active than terraces and this is attributed to differences in the preexponential term. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252-260
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Catalysis
Volume224
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jun 2004

Keywords

  • DFT
  • N(2)O decomposition
  • platinum
  • catalysis
  • DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY
  • SUPPORTED RHODIUM CATALYSTS
  • TRANSITION-METAL SURFACES
  • NO+CO REACTION SYSTEM
  • PLUS CO REACTION
  • NITROUS-OXIDE
  • MECHANISTIC IMPORTANCE
  • PT/SIO2 CATALYSTS
  • POLYCRYSTALLINE PLATINUM
  • SELECTIVE REDUCTION

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