A Comparison of Tact Training and Bidirectional Intraverbal Training in Teaching a Foreign Language: A Refined Replication

Damien Daly, Katerina Dounavi

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Abstract

The present study aimed to replicate the findings of Dounavi (2014) by evaluating the effects of foreign tact and bi-directional intraverbal training on emergent verbal relations. Training involved teaching three English-speaking adults to tact visual stimuli according to their foreign (French) referents, and to vocally emit the reverse relation following the presentation of written words in native-to-foreign (English-to-French) and foreign-to-native (French-to-English) intraverbal relations. A modified multiple probe design using pre- and post-training probes was used to assess the efficacy of each training method in teaching a small foreign language vocabulary and to probe for emergent relations following training. The findings showed that foreign tact and native-to-foreign intraverbal training was more efficient and resulted in greater emergent responding than training in the foreign-to-native relation. Follow-up probes were conducted four weeks after the post-training probes to evaluate the levels of responding for each of the trained and emergent relations. Results from maintenance probes were varied across the trained and emergent relations; interestingly, the levels of responding in the emergent relations was greater.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-255
Number of pages13
JournalThe Psychological Record
Volume70
Early online date28 Apr 2020
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 28 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • foreign language
  • emergent relations
  • intraverbals
  • tacts
  • maintenance

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