A Controlled Pilot Trial of PainTracker Self-Manager, a Web-Based Platform Combined With Patient Coaching, to Support Patients’ Self-Management of Chronic Pain

Mark Sullivan*, Dale J. Langford, Pamela Stitzlein Davies, Christine Tran, Roger Vilardaga, Gifford Cheung, Daisy Yoo, Justin McReynolds, William B. Lober, David Tauben, Kevin E. Vowles

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to develop and pilot test a chronic pain empowerment and self-management platform, derived from acceptance and commitment therapy, in a pain specialty setting. A controlled, sequential, nonrandomized study design was used to accommodate intervention development and to test the efficacy of the PainTracker Self-Manager (PTSM) intervention (Web-based educational modules and outcome tracking combined with tailored patient coaching sessions and provider guidance). Generalized estimating equations evaluated changes over time (baseline, 3 months, 6 months) in pain self-efficacy (primary outcome), chronic pain acceptance (activity engagement and pain willingness), perceived efficacy in patient–provider interactions, pain intensity and interference, and overall satisfaction with pain treatment (secondary outcomes) between intervention (n = 48) and usual care control groups (n = 51). The full study sample (N = 99) showed greater improvements over time (significant Group × Time interactions) in pain self-efficacy and satisfaction with pain treatment. Among study completers (n = 82), greater improvement in activity engagement as well as pain intensity and interference were also observed. These preliminary findings support the efficacy of the PTSM intervention in a pain specialty setting. Further research is needed to refine and expand the PTSM intervention and to test it in a randomized trial in primary care settings. Perspective: We developed a Web-based patient empowerment platform that combined acceptance and commitment therapy-based educational modules and tailored coaching sessions with longitudinal tracking of treatments and patient-reported outcomes, named PTSM. Pilot controlled trial results provide preliminary support for its efficacy in improving pain self-efficacy, activity engagement, pain intensity and interference, and satisfaction with pain treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)996-1005
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pain
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

Self Care
Chronic Pain
Pain
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Self Efficacy
Mentoring
Patient Participation
Primary Health Care
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Acceptance and commitment therapy
  • health coaching
  • patient empowerment
  • patient-reported outcomes

Cite this

Sullivan, Mark ; Langford, Dale J. ; Davies, Pamela Stitzlein ; Tran, Christine ; Vilardaga, Roger ; Cheung, Gifford ; Yoo, Daisy ; McReynolds, Justin ; Lober, William B. ; Tauben, David ; Vowles, Kevin E. / A Controlled Pilot Trial of PainTracker Self-Manager, a Web-Based Platform Combined With Patient Coaching, to Support Patients’ Self-Management of Chronic Pain. In: Journal of Pain. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 9. pp. 996-1005.
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Sullivan, M, Langford, DJ, Davies, PS, Tran, C, Vilardaga, R, Cheung, G, Yoo, D, McReynolds, J, Lober, WB, Tauben, D & Vowles, KE 2018, 'A Controlled Pilot Trial of PainTracker Self-Manager, a Web-Based Platform Combined With Patient Coaching, to Support Patients’ Self-Management of Chronic Pain', Journal of Pain, vol. 19, no. 9, pp. 996-1005. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2018.03.009

A Controlled Pilot Trial of PainTracker Self-Manager, a Web-Based Platform Combined With Patient Coaching, to Support Patients’ Self-Management of Chronic Pain. / Sullivan, Mark; Langford, Dale J.; Davies, Pamela Stitzlein; Tran, Christine; Vilardaga, Roger; Cheung, Gifford; Yoo, Daisy; McReynolds, Justin; Lober, William B.; Tauben, David; Vowles, Kevin E.

In: Journal of Pain, Vol. 19, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 996-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Sullivan, Mark

AU - Langford, Dale J.

AU - Davies, Pamela Stitzlein

AU - Tran, Christine

AU - Vilardaga, Roger

AU - Cheung, Gifford

AU - Yoo, Daisy

AU - McReynolds, Justin

AU - Lober, William B.

AU - Tauben, David

AU - Vowles, Kevin E.

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