'A nation depends on its children': School buildings and citizenship in England and Wales, 1900-1939

Tom Hulme*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calls for a renewed sense of good citizenship in the early twentieth century were loud and persistent. Especially important in the citizenship quest was the creation of healthy and efficient children, cured of urban maladies and loyal to a wide notion of community. Such attributes were seen as vital in an economically and militarily competitive world. Historians have already examined the sorts of political and bodily education that arose from these concerns. This article instead looks at how the focus on the body and citizenship was realized in the actual processes of school building. From the medical discourses that underpinned the design of heating, lighting, and ventilation systems, to the emerging focus on the sensory environment of the classroom, the materiality of the school was essential to creating the good citizen - physically fit, economically productive, and loyal to the nation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406-432
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of British Studies
Volume54
Issue number2
Early online date15 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Cultural Studies

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of ''A nation depends on its children': School buildings and citizenship in England and Wales, 1900-1939'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this