A new landscape of arts-based buildings and comparative cultural policies on the island of Ireland: the curse of Jocasta's necklace

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Much current cultural policy research focuses on activity traditionally viewed as arts practice: visual arts, music, literature and dance. Architecture’s role in the discussion of cultural policy is, however, less certain and thus less frequently interrogated. The study presented here both addresses this dearth of in-depth research while also contributing to the interdisciplinary discussion of cultural policy in wider terms. In seeking to better understand how architectural culture is regulated and administered in a specific case study, it unpacks how the complicated relationships of nominal and explicit policies on both sides of the Irish/Northern Irish border contributed to the significant expansion of arts-based buildings 1995-2008. It contrasts political and cultural motivations behind these projects during a period of significant economic growth, investment and inward immigration. Data has been gathered from both official published policies as well as interviews with elite actors in the decision-making field and architects who produced the buildings of interest in both countries. With the sizeable number of arts-based buildings now completed in both Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland, one must wonder if this necklace of buildings is, like Jocasta’s, a thing of both beauty and redolent with a potential future curse. It is the goal of this project to contribute to the larger applied and critical discussion of these issues and to engage with future policy design, administration and, certainly, evaluation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)37-55
    Number of pages19
    JournalArchNet - IJAR
    Volume6
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012
    EventThe 6th International Conference on Cultural Policy Research - Jyväskylä, Finland
    Duration: 24 Aug 201027 Aug 2010

    Keywords

    • Comparative cultural policy, architecture, Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A new landscape of arts-based buildings and comparative cultural policies on the island of Ireland: the curse of Jocasta's necklace'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this