A novel method of determining the active drag profile in swimming via data manipulation of multiple tension force collection methods

A. Haskins*, C. McCabe, R. Kennedy, R. McWade, A. B. Lennon, D. Chandar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

A novel method aimed at evaluating the active drag profile during front-crawl swimming is proposed. Fourteen full trials were conducted with each trial using a stationary load cell set-up and a commercial resistance trainer to record the tension force in a rope, caused by an athlete swimming. Seven different stroke cycles in each experiment were identified for resampling time dependent data into position dependent data. Active drag was then calculated by subtracting resistance trainer force data away from the stationary load cell force data. Mean active drag values across the stroke cycle were calculated for comparison with existing methods, with mean active drag values calculated between 76 and 140 N depending on the trial. Comparing results with established active drag methods, such as the Velocity Perturbation Method (VPM), shows agreement in the magnitude of the mean active drag forces. Repeatability was investigated using one athlete, repeating the load cell set-up experiment, indicating results collected could range by 88 N depending on stroke cycle position. Variation in results is likely due to inconsistencies in swimmer technique and power output, although further investigation is required. The method outlined is proposed as a representation of the active drag profile over a full stroke cycle.
Original languageEnglish
Article number10896
JournalNature Scientific Reports
Volume13
Early online date05 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Active drag
  • Swimming
  • Gravitation
  • Biomechanical Phenomena
  • Humans
  • Mechanical Phenomena

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