A Numerical and Experimental Assessment of the Use of a Turbine Utilizing Splitter Blades for an Automotive Variable Geometry Turbocharger

Jason Walkingshaw, Stephen Spence, Dietmar Filsinger, David Thornhill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Automotive manufacturers require improved part load engine performance to further improve fuel economy. For a swing vane VGS (Variable Geometry Stator) turbine this means a more closed stator vane, to deal with the low MFRs (Mass Flow Rates), high PRs (Pressure Ratios) and low rotor rotational speeds. During these conditions the turbine is operating at low velocity ratios. As more energy is available at high pressure ratios and during lower turbocharger rotational speeds, a turbine which is efficient at these conditions is desirable. Another key aspect for automotive manufacturers is engine responsiveness. High inertia designs result in “turbo lag” which means an increased time before the target boost pressure is reached. Therefore, designs with improved performance at low velocity ratios, reduced inertia or an increased swallowing capacity are the current targets for turbocharger manufacturers.

To try to meet these design targets a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) study was performed on a turbine wheel using splitter blades. A number of parameters were investigated. These included splitter blade merdional length, blade number and blade angle distribution.

The numerical study was performed on a scaled automotive VGS. Three different stator vane positions have been analysed. A single passage CFD model was developed and used to provide information on the flow features affecting performance in both the stator vanes and turbine.

Following the CFD investigation the design with the best compromise in terms of performance, inertia and increased MFP (Mass Flow Parameter) was selected for manufacture and testing. Tests were performed on a scaled, low temperature turbine test rig. The aerodynamic flow path of the gas stand was the same as that investigated during the CFD. The test results revealed a design which had similar performance at the closed stator vane positions when compared to the baseline wheel. At the maximum MFR stator vane condition a drop of −0.6% pts in efficiency was seen. However, 5.5% increase in MFP was obtained with the additional benefit of a drop in rotor inertia of 3.7%, compared to the baseline wheel.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition
PublisherThe American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
Volume2D
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-7918-4563-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014
EventASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition - Düsseldorf, Germany
Duration: 16 Jun 201420 Jun 2014

Conference

ConferenceASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition
CountryGermany
CityDüsseldorf
Period16/06/201420/06/2014

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  • Cite this

    Walkingshaw, J., Spence, S., Filsinger, D., & Thornhill, D. (2014). A Numerical and Experimental Assessment of the Use of a Turbine Utilizing Splitter Blades for an Automotive Variable Geometry Turbocharger. In Proceedings of ASME Turbo Expo 2014: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition (Vol. 2D, pp. 1-14). [GT2014-26097] The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/GT2014-26097