A review of Ni-like X-ray laser experiments undertaken using the VULCAN laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

Ciaran Lewis, G.J. Tallents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Recent progress using the VULCAN laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory to pump X-ray lasing in nickel-like ions is reviewed. Double pulse pumping with similar to 100 ps pulses has been shown to produce significantly greater X-ray laser output than single pulses of duration 0.1-1 ns. With double pulse pumping, the main pumping pulse interacts with a pre-formed plasma created by a pre-pulse. The efficiency of lasing increases as there is a reduced effect of refraction of the X-ray laser beam due to smaller density gradients and larger gain volumes, which enable propagation of the X-ray laser beam along the full length of the target. The record shortest wavelength saturated laser at 5.9 nm has been achieved in Ni-like dysprosium using double pulse pumping of 75 ps duration from the VULCAN laser. A variant of the double pulse pumping using a single similar to 100 ps laser pulse and a superimposed short similar to 1 ps pulse has been found to further increase the efficiency of lasing by reducing the effects of over-ionisation during the gain period. The record shortest wavelength saturated laser pumped by a short similar to 1 ps pulse has been achieved in Ni-like samarium using the VULCAN laser operating in chirped pulse amplified (CPA) mode. Ni-like samarium lases at 7.3 nm. (C) 2000 Academie des sciences/Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1053-1063
Number of pages11
JournalCOMPTES RENDUS DE L ACADEMIE DES SCIENCES SERIE IV PHYSIQUE ASTROPHYSIQUE
Volume1
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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