A review of the equations used to predict the velocity distribution within a ship’s propeller jet

Wei-Haur Lam, Gerard Hamill, Y.C. Song, Desmond Robinson, S. Raghunathan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    38 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Predicting the velocity within the ship’s propeller jet is the initial step to investigate the scouring made by the propeller jet. Albertson et al. (1950) suggested the investigation of a submerged jet can be undertaken through observation of the plain water jet from an orifice. The plain water jet investigation of Albertson et al. (1950) was based on the axial momentum theory. This has been the basis of all subsequent work with propeller jets. In reality, the velocity characteristic of a ship’s propeller jet is more complicated than a plain water jet. Fuehrer and Römisch (1977), Blaauw and van de Kaa (1978), Berger et al. (1981), Verhey (1983) and Hamill (1987) have carried out investigations using physical model. This paper reviews the state-of-art of the equations used to predict the time-averaged axial, tangential and radial components of velocity within the zone of flow establishment and the zone of established flow of a ship’s propeller jet.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-10
    Number of pages10
    JournalOcean Engineering
    Volume38
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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    Ship propellers
    Velocity distribution
    Propellers
    Water
    Orifices
    Momentum

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Predicting the velocity within the ship’s propeller jet is the initial step to investigate the scouring made by the propeller jet. Albertson et al. (1950) suggested the investigation of a submerged jet can be undertaken through observation of the plain water jet from an orifice. The plain water jet investigation of Albertson et al. (1950) was based on the axial momentum theory. This has been the basis of all subsequent work with propeller jets. In reality, the velocity characteristic of a ship’s propeller jet is more complicated than a plain water jet. Fuehrer and R{\"o}misch (1977), Blaauw and van de Kaa (1978), Berger et al. (1981), Verhey (1983) and Hamill (1987) have carried out investigations using physical model. This paper reviews the state-of-art of the equations used to predict the time-averaged axial, tangential and radial components of velocity within the zone of flow establishment and the zone of established flow of a ship’s propeller jet.",
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    A review of the equations used to predict the velocity distribution within a ship’s propeller jet. / Lam, Wei-Haur; Hamill, Gerard; Song, Y.C.; Robinson, Desmond; Raghunathan, S.

    In: Ocean Engineering, Vol. 38 , No. 1, 01.2011, p. 1-10.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Hamill, Gerard

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