A review of the global pesticide legislation and the scale of challenge in reaching the global harmonization of food safety standards

Caroline E. Handford, Christopher T. Elliott, Katrina Campbell*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pesticide use is important in agriculture to protect crops and improve productivity. However, they have the potential to cause adverse human health or environmental effects, dependent on exposure levels. This review examines existing pesticide legislation worldwide, focusing on the level of harmonisation, and impacts of differing legislation on food safety and trade. Pesticide legislation varies greatly worldwide as countries have different requirements guidelines and legal limits for plant protection. Developed nations have more stringent regulations than developing countries, which lack the resources and expertise to adequately implement and enforce legislation. Global differences in pesticide legislation act as a technical barrier to trade. International parties such as the European Union (EU), Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex), and North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) have attempted to harmonise pesticide legislation by providing maximum residue limits (MRLs), but globally these limits remain variable. Globally harmonised pesticide standards would serve to increase productivity, profits and trade, and enhance the ability to protect public health and the environment. 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)525-536
Number of pages12
JournalIntegrated Environmental Assessment and Management
Volume11
Issue number4
Early online date30 Apr 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

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