A role for the enteric nervous system in the response to helminth infections

D.M. McKay, Ian Fairweather

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The enteric nervous system (ENS) in the gut contains a particularly high concentration of nerve cells, and effectively functions as an independent 'minibrain'. Interactions between nerve, endocrine, immune and other cell types allow the sophisticated regulation of normal gut physiology. They can also bring about a co-ordinated response to parasitic infection, possibly leading to expulsion of the parasite. In this review, Derek McKay and Ian Fairweather will consider, in brief, data pertaining to changes in the ENS following intestinal helminth infections and speculate on the role that these alterations may have in the expulsion of the parasite burden and the putative ability of the parasite to modulate these events.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-69
Number of pages7
JournalParasitology Today
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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