A Shared Narrative?: A Case Study of the Contested Legacy of Policing in the North of Ireland

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Abstract

This article critically examines the difficulty with creating a shared narrative in post-conflict Northern Ireland. Using the legacy of policing as a case study for drawing more general conclusions about creating a shared narrative, the article interrogates how disagreement over where to start and end the discussion and exclusivist approaches to victimhood are obstructing attainment of a shared narrative. The article analyses competing policing narratives as constructed from the lived reality of opposing ethno-nationalist collectives with different experiences in a heated ‘memory politics’ domain. Concluding with the argument that the prerequisite to successfully building a shared narrative is departure from competing ‘memory politics’ understandings of the past, the article suggests a new understanding of victimhood and perpetratorship in Northern Ireland.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1047 - 1066
JournalBritish Journal of Criminology
Volume54
Issue number6
Early online date27 Aug 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

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