A spatial analysis of health status in Britain, 1991–2011

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using Census-derived data for consistent spatial units, this paper explores how the population of Britain in 1991, 2001 and 2011 was spatially structured by self-reported health including exploring the trajectories of change. This paper uses consistent small area units to examine the changing spatial structure of census-derived Limiting, Long-Term Illness (LLTI) in Britain over the twenty year period and utilises the 2011 Office for National Statistics Output Area Classification (OAC) as a geodemographic indicator. The results allow the geography of change to be captured, highlighting how health is inextricably linked to geography, demonstrating quantitatively a complex, yet distinctive, spatial organisation of health inequalities within Britain. Overall decreasing unevenness values, coupled with increased positive spatial association suggests that neighbouring areas have become more similar over time – the distinction between areas characterised by poor health or by good health is decreasing.

LanguageEnglish
Pages340-352
Number of pages13
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume220
Early online date14 Nov 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2019

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Spatial Analysis
Health Status
health status
Health
health
Geography
Censuses
census
geography
illness
statistics
Population
Values

Keywords

  • Census
  • Clustering
  • Great Britain
  • Health
  • Inequalities
  • Limiting long term illness
  • Segregation
  • Spatial

Cite this

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A spatial analysis of health status in Britain, 1991–2011. / Dearden, Emily K.; Lloyd, Christopher D.; Catney, Gemma.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 220, 01.01.2019, p. 340-352.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Lloyd, Christopher D.

AU - Catney, Gemma

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KW - Clustering

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KW - Inequalities

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