A strategy for designing inhibitors of alpha-synuclein aggregation and toxicity as a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

Patrick Harriott, O.M. El-Agnaf, K.E. Paleologou, Brett Greer, A.M. Abogrein, J.E. King, S.A. Salem, N.J. Fullwood, F.E. Benson, R. Hewitt, K.J. Ford, F.L. Martin, M.R. Cookson, D. Allsop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

132 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Convergent biochemical and genetic evidence suggests that the formation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) protein deposits is an important and, probably, seminal step in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). It has been reported that transgenic animals overexpressing human alpha-syn develop lesions similar to those found in the brain in PD, together with a progressive loss of dopaminergic cells and associated abnormalities of motor function. Inhibiting and/or reversing alpha-syn self-aggregation could, therefore, provide a novel approach to treating the underlying cause of these diseases. We synthesized a library of overlapping 7-mer peptides spanning the entire alpha-syn sequence, and identified amino acid residues 64-100 of alpha-syn as the binding region responsible for its self-association. Modified short peptides containing alpha-syn amino acid sequences from part of this binding region (residues 69-72), named alpha-syn inhibitors (ASI), were found to interact with full-length alpha-syn and block its assembly into both early oligomers and mature amyloid-like fibrils. We also developed a cell-permeable inhibitor of alpha-syn aggregation (ASID), using the polyarginine peptide delivery system. This ASID peptide was able to inhibit the DNA damage induced by Fe(II) in neuronal cells transfected with alpha-syn(A53T), a familial PD-associated mutation. ASI peptides without this delivery system did not reverse levels of Fe(II)-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the ASID peptide increased (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1315-1317
Number of pages3
JournalThe FASEB Journal
Volume18 (11)
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

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alpha-Synuclein
Parkinson disease
Parkinson Disease
Toxicity
Agglomeration
peptides
toxicity
Peptides
DNA Damage
Amino Acid Sequence
DNA damage
Multiple System Atrophy
Lewy Body Disease
Genetically Modified Animals
Amino Acids
transgenic animals
Amyloid
dementia
DNA
Libraries

Cite this

Harriott, Patrick ; El-Agnaf, O.M. ; Paleologou, K.E. ; Greer, Brett ; Abogrein, A.M. ; King, J.E. ; Salem, S.A. ; Fullwood, N.J. ; Benson, F.E. ; Hewitt, R. ; Ford, K.J. ; Martin, F.L. ; Cookson, M.R. ; Allsop, D. / A strategy for designing inhibitors of alpha-synuclein aggregation and toxicity as a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease and related disorders. In: The FASEB Journal. 2004 ; Vol. 18 (11), No. 11. pp. 1315-1317.
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abstract = "Convergent biochemical and genetic evidence suggests that the formation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) protein deposits is an important and, probably, seminal step in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). It has been reported that transgenic animals overexpressing human alpha-syn develop lesions similar to those found in the brain in PD, together with a progressive loss of dopaminergic cells and associated abnormalities of motor function. Inhibiting and/or reversing alpha-syn self-aggregation could, therefore, provide a novel approach to treating the underlying cause of these diseases. We synthesized a library of overlapping 7-mer peptides spanning the entire alpha-syn sequence, and identified amino acid residues 64-100 of alpha-syn as the binding region responsible for its self-association. Modified short peptides containing alpha-syn amino acid sequences from part of this binding region (residues 69-72), named alpha-syn inhibitors (ASI), were found to interact with full-length alpha-syn and block its assembly into both early oligomers and mature amyloid-like fibrils. We also developed a cell-permeable inhibitor of alpha-syn aggregation (ASID), using the polyarginine peptide delivery system. This ASID peptide was able to inhibit the DNA damage induced by Fe(II) in neuronal cells transfected with alpha-syn(A53T), a familial PD-associated mutation. ASI peptides without this delivery system did not reverse levels of Fe(II)-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the ASID peptide increased (P",
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Harriott, P, El-Agnaf, OM, Paleologou, KE, Greer, B, Abogrein, AM, King, JE, Salem, SA, Fullwood, NJ, Benson, FE, Hewitt, R, Ford, KJ, Martin, FL, Cookson, MR & Allsop, D 2004, 'A strategy for designing inhibitors of alpha-synuclein aggregation and toxicity as a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease and related disorders.', The FASEB Journal, vol. 18 (11), no. 11, pp. 1315-1317. https://doi.org/10.1096/fj.03-1346fje

A strategy for designing inhibitors of alpha-synuclein aggregation and toxicity as a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease and related disorders. / Harriott, Patrick; El-Agnaf, O.M.; Paleologou, K.E.; Greer, Brett; Abogrein, A.M.; King, J.E.; Salem, S.A.; Fullwood, N.J.; Benson, F.E.; Hewitt, R.; Ford, K.J.; Martin, F.L.; Cookson, M.R.; Allsop, D.

In: The FASEB Journal, Vol. 18 (11), No. 11, 08.2004, p. 1315-1317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - A strategy for designing inhibitors of alpha-synuclein aggregation and toxicity as a novel treatment for Parkinson's disease and related disorders.

AU - Harriott, Patrick

AU - El-Agnaf, O.M.

AU - Paleologou, K.E.

AU - Greer, Brett

AU - Abogrein, A.M.

AU - King, J.E.

AU - Salem, S.A.

AU - Fullwood, N.J.

AU - Benson, F.E.

AU - Hewitt, R.

AU - Ford, K.J.

AU - Martin, F.L.

AU - Cookson, M.R.

AU - Allsop, D.

PY - 2004/8

Y1 - 2004/8

N2 - Convergent biochemical and genetic evidence suggests that the formation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) protein deposits is an important and, probably, seminal step in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). It has been reported that transgenic animals overexpressing human alpha-syn develop lesions similar to those found in the brain in PD, together with a progressive loss of dopaminergic cells and associated abnormalities of motor function. Inhibiting and/or reversing alpha-syn self-aggregation could, therefore, provide a novel approach to treating the underlying cause of these diseases. We synthesized a library of overlapping 7-mer peptides spanning the entire alpha-syn sequence, and identified amino acid residues 64-100 of alpha-syn as the binding region responsible for its self-association. Modified short peptides containing alpha-syn amino acid sequences from part of this binding region (residues 69-72), named alpha-syn inhibitors (ASI), were found to interact with full-length alpha-syn and block its assembly into both early oligomers and mature amyloid-like fibrils. We also developed a cell-permeable inhibitor of alpha-syn aggregation (ASID), using the polyarginine peptide delivery system. This ASID peptide was able to inhibit the DNA damage induced by Fe(II) in neuronal cells transfected with alpha-syn(A53T), a familial PD-associated mutation. ASI peptides without this delivery system did not reverse levels of Fe(II)-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the ASID peptide increased (P

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