A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team

Kate Russo, Amanda Crossan, Alastair Reid, Carol Guinan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Objective: This retrospective audit was undertaken to explore the nature of referrals made by the paediatric CF team to the Clinical Psychologist over a period of 10 years. The aim of the audit was to identify patterns or trends related to difficulties referred by the team.
Methods: A database consisting of all referrals received over a ten year period from 2001-2010 was created. A coding template was then created by KR and AC, which allowed for the categorisation of referrals into three main themes: Mood disturbance; CF related events; and non-CF related events. The same coding template was used to categorise referrals to the adult CF service. Descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data.
Results: Over the ten year period, 106 young people with CF were referred to psychology, representing 266 referrals. On average, a referral was made every two weeks. The most common reason for referral was for CF related events (i.e. adherence, living everyday life with CF). Referrals were found to increase with age. Both genders were equally likely to be referred, with females being re-referred most frequently, indicating increased psychological morbidity. The majority of referrals (79%) were repeat referrals, indicating that psychology input is focused upon a small number of young people but over a period of time. In a typical year (09-10), only 16% of all young people with CF were able to access psychology services. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns related to inequality of access, gender differences, and the identification of common concerns across age groups. The audit also highlighted areas where early intervention and training efforts could be targeted.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationJournal of Cystic Fibrosis
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference
Place of PublicationHamburg
Volume10
EditionSupplement 1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Clinical Psychology
Referral and Consultation
Pediatrics
Psychology
Age Groups
Databases
Morbidity

Cite this

Russo, K., Crossan, A., Reid, A., & Guinan, C. (2011). A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team. In Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Proceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference (Supplement 1 ed., Vol. 10). Hamburg.
Russo, Kate ; Crossan, Amanda ; Reid, Alastair ; Guinan, Carol. / A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team. Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Proceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference. Vol. 10 Supplement 1. ed. Hamburg, 2011.
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abstract = "Objective: This retrospective audit was undertaken to explore the nature of referrals made by the paediatric CF team to the Clinical Psychologist over a period of 10 years. The aim of the audit was to identify patterns or trends related to difficulties referred by the team. Methods: A database consisting of all referrals received over a ten year period from 2001-2010 was created. A coding template was then created by KR and AC, which allowed for the categorisation of referrals into three main themes: Mood disturbance; CF related events; and non-CF related events. The same coding template was used to categorise referrals to the adult CF service. Descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results: Over the ten year period, 106 young people with CF were referred to psychology, representing 266 referrals. On average, a referral was made every two weeks. The most common reason for referral was for CF related events (i.e. adherence, living everyday life with CF). Referrals were found to increase with age. Both genders were equally likely to be referred, with females being re-referred most frequently, indicating increased psychological morbidity. The majority of referrals (79{\%}) were repeat referrals, indicating that psychology input is focused upon a small number of young people but over a period of time. In a typical year (09-10), only 16{\%} of all young people with CF were able to access psychology services. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns related to inequality of access, gender differences, and the identification of common concerns across age groups. The audit also highlighted areas where early intervention and training efforts could be targeted.",
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Russo, K, Crossan, A, Reid, A & Guinan, C 2011, A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team. in Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Proceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference. Supplement 1 edn, vol. 10, Hamburg.

A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team. / Russo, Kate; Crossan, Amanda; Reid, Alastair; Guinan, Carol.

Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Proceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference. Vol. 10 Supplement 1. ed. Hamburg, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team

AU - Russo, Kate

AU - Crossan, Amanda

AU - Reid, Alastair

AU - Guinan, Carol

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N2 - Objective: This retrospective audit was undertaken to explore the nature of referrals made by the paediatric CF team to the Clinical Psychologist over a period of 10 years. The aim of the audit was to identify patterns or trends related to difficulties referred by the team. Methods: A database consisting of all referrals received over a ten year period from 2001-2010 was created. A coding template was then created by KR and AC, which allowed for the categorisation of referrals into three main themes: Mood disturbance; CF related events; and non-CF related events. The same coding template was used to categorise referrals to the adult CF service. Descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results: Over the ten year period, 106 young people with CF were referred to psychology, representing 266 referrals. On average, a referral was made every two weeks. The most common reason for referral was for CF related events (i.e. adherence, living everyday life with CF). Referrals were found to increase with age. Both genders were equally likely to be referred, with females being re-referred most frequently, indicating increased psychological morbidity. The majority of referrals (79%) were repeat referrals, indicating that psychology input is focused upon a small number of young people but over a period of time. In a typical year (09-10), only 16% of all young people with CF were able to access psychology services. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns related to inequality of access, gender differences, and the identification of common concerns across age groups. The audit also highlighted areas where early intervention and training efforts could be targeted.

AB - Objective: This retrospective audit was undertaken to explore the nature of referrals made by the paediatric CF team to the Clinical Psychologist over a period of 10 years. The aim of the audit was to identify patterns or trends related to difficulties referred by the team. Methods: A database consisting of all referrals received over a ten year period from 2001-2010 was created. A coding template was then created by KR and AC, which allowed for the categorisation of referrals into three main themes: Mood disturbance; CF related events; and non-CF related events. The same coding template was used to categorise referrals to the adult CF service. Descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results: Over the ten year period, 106 young people with CF were referred to psychology, representing 266 referrals. On average, a referral was made every two weeks. The most common reason for referral was for CF related events (i.e. adherence, living everyday life with CF). Referrals were found to increase with age. Both genders were equally likely to be referred, with females being re-referred most frequently, indicating increased psychological morbidity. The majority of referrals (79%) were repeat referrals, indicating that psychology input is focused upon a small number of young people but over a period of time. In a typical year (09-10), only 16% of all young people with CF were able to access psychology services. Conclusion: This audit identified patterns related to inequality of access, gender differences, and the identification of common concerns across age groups. The audit also highlighted areas where early intervention and training efforts could be targeted.

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - 10

BT - Journal of Cystic Fibrosis

CY - Hamburg

ER -

Russo K, Crossan A, Reid A, Guinan C. A ten year retrospective audit of clinical psychology referrals within a paediatric CF team. In Journal of Cystic Fibrosis: Proceedings of the 34th European Cystic Fibrosis Conference. Supplement 1 ed. Vol. 10. Hamburg. 2011