Accuracy of shoulder joint and subacromial injections in cadavers.

N Hanchard, Donal Shanahan, T Howe, J Thompson, L Goodchild

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

"Blind" shoulder injections are often inaccurate and infiltrate untargeted structures. We tested a hypothesis that optimizing certain anatomical and positional factors would improve accuracy and reduce dispersal.

METHODS:

We evaluated one subacromial and one glenohumeral injection technique on cadavers.

RESULTS:

Mean accuracy was 91% for subacromial-targeted and 74 and 91% (worst- and best-case scenarios) for joint-targeted injections. Mean dispersal was 19% for subacromial-targeted and 16% for joint-targeted injections. All results bettered those reported previously.

CONCLUSION:

These "optimized" techniques might improve accuracy and limit dispersal of blind shoulder injections in clinical situations, benefiting efficacy and safety. However, evaluation is required in a clinical setting.
Original languageEnglish
Article number3
Pages (from-to)1143
Number of pages1146
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume33
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2006

Keywords

  • Injection
  • upper limb joints

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