Acute pain services following surgery for colorectal cancer

Simon Higgs, Richard Henry, Marie Glackin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper evaluates the pain management provided to patients following surgery for colorectal cancer. These patients were part of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme, which among other goals, aims to reduce length of hospital stay. The aim of the service evaluation was to investigate the success of the pain service in meeting the needs of the patients in relation to provision of analgesia for their postoperative recovery, ensuring that the ERAS programme wasn't compromising patient satisfaction. Findings demonstrate high levels of satisfaction with pain management and the approach of staff. The study also reinforces findings that there is a paradoxical link between pain intensity and patient satisfaction. However, despite advances in care, treatments and services, patients continue to experience high levels of pain after surgery and recommendations are made on how pain management services provided to patients after surgery might be enhanced.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S4-S11
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Volume23
Issue numberSup2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Pain Clinics
Colorectal Neoplasms
Pain Management
Patient Satisfaction
Pain
Length of Stay
Analgesia

Cite this

Higgs, Simon ; Henry, Richard ; Glackin, Marie. / Acute pain services following surgery for colorectal cancer. In: British Journal of Nursing. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. Sup2. pp. S4-S11.
@article{62009bbac31e4aed989492c33e235b3f,
title = "Acute pain services following surgery for colorectal cancer",
abstract = "This paper evaluates the pain management provided to patients following surgery for colorectal cancer. These patients were part of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme, which among other goals, aims to reduce length of hospital stay. The aim of the service evaluation was to investigate the success of the pain service in meeting the needs of the patients in relation to provision of analgesia for their postoperative recovery, ensuring that the ERAS programme wasn't compromising patient satisfaction. Findings demonstrate high levels of satisfaction with pain management and the approach of staff. The study also reinforces findings that there is a paradoxical link between pain intensity and patient satisfaction. However, despite advances in care, treatments and services, patients continue to experience high levels of pain after surgery and recommendations are made on how pain management services provided to patients after surgery might be enhanced.",
author = "Simon Higgs and Richard Henry and Marie Glackin",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.12968/bjon.2014.23.Sup2.S4",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "S4--S11",
journal = "British Journal of Nursing",
issn = "0966-0461",
publisher = "MA Healthcare Ltd",
number = "Sup2",

}

Acute pain services following surgery for colorectal cancer. / Higgs, Simon; Henry, Richard; Glackin, Marie.

In: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 23, No. Sup2, 02.2014, p. S4-S11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute pain services following surgery for colorectal cancer

AU - Higgs, Simon

AU - Henry, Richard

AU - Glackin, Marie

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - This paper evaluates the pain management provided to patients following surgery for colorectal cancer. These patients were part of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme, which among other goals, aims to reduce length of hospital stay. The aim of the service evaluation was to investigate the success of the pain service in meeting the needs of the patients in relation to provision of analgesia for their postoperative recovery, ensuring that the ERAS programme wasn't compromising patient satisfaction. Findings demonstrate high levels of satisfaction with pain management and the approach of staff. The study also reinforces findings that there is a paradoxical link between pain intensity and patient satisfaction. However, despite advances in care, treatments and services, patients continue to experience high levels of pain after surgery and recommendations are made on how pain management services provided to patients after surgery might be enhanced.

AB - This paper evaluates the pain management provided to patients following surgery for colorectal cancer. These patients were part of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme, which among other goals, aims to reduce length of hospital stay. The aim of the service evaluation was to investigate the success of the pain service in meeting the needs of the patients in relation to provision of analgesia for their postoperative recovery, ensuring that the ERAS programme wasn't compromising patient satisfaction. Findings demonstrate high levels of satisfaction with pain management and the approach of staff. The study also reinforces findings that there is a paradoxical link between pain intensity and patient satisfaction. However, despite advances in care, treatments and services, patients continue to experience high levels of pain after surgery and recommendations are made on how pain management services provided to patients after surgery might be enhanced.

U2 - 10.12968/bjon.2014.23.Sup2.S4

DO - 10.12968/bjon.2014.23.Sup2.S4

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - S4-S11

JO - British Journal of Nursing

JF - British Journal of Nursing

SN - 0966-0461

IS - Sup2

ER -