Adherence to the EAT-Lancet reference diet is associated with a reduced risk of incident cancer and all-cause mortality in UK adults

Nena Karavasiloglou, Alysha S. Thompson, Giulia Pestoni, Anika Knuppel, Keren Papier, Aedín Cassidy, Tilman Kühn, Sabine Rohrmann*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Food systems have been identified as significant contributors to the global environmental emergency. However, there is no universally agreed-upon definition of what constitutes a planetary healthy, sustainable diet. In our study, we investigated the association between the EAT-Lancet reference diet, a diet within the planetary boundaries, and incident cancer, incident major cardiovascular events, and all-cause mortality. Higher adherence to the EAT-Lancet reference diet was associated with lower incident cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR]continuous: 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98–0.99]) and lower all-cause mortality (HR continuous: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.98–0.99), while mostly null associations were detected for major cardiovascular event risk (HR continuous: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.98–1.01). Stratified analyses using potentially modifiable risk factors led to similar results. Our findings, in conjunction with the existing literature, support that adoption of the EAT-Lancet reference diet could have a benefit for the prevention of non-communicable diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1726-1734
Number of pages9
JournalOne Earth
Volume6
Issue number12
Early online date21 Nov 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2023

Keywords

  • Sustainable
  • Diet
  • Cancer
  • Cardiovascular
  • Incidence
  • Mortality
  • EAT-Lancet

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