Adolescents’ relationship with God and internalizing adjustment over time: The moderating role of maternal religious coping

Marcie C. Goeke-Morey, Laura K. Taylor, Christine E. Merrilees, Peter Shirlow, Mark E. Cummings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A growing literature supports the importance of understanding the link between religiosity and youths' adjustment and development, but in the absence of rigorous, longitudinal designs, questions remain about the direction of effect and the role of family factors. This paper investigates the bidirectional association between adolescents' relationship with God and their internalizing adjustment. Results from 2-wave, SEM cross-lag analyses of data from 667 mother/adolescent dyads in Belfast, Northern Ireland (50% male, M age = 15.75 years old) supports a risk model suggesting that greater internalizing problems predict a weaker relationship with God 1 year later. Significant moderation analyses suggest that a stronger relationship with God predicted fewer depression and anxiety symptoms for youth whose mothers used more religious coping.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)749-758
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014

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