Affective disruption: Walter Benjamin and the 'history' of Ireland's industrial schools

K. Kenny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
189 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

What role do organizations play in writing history? In this paper, I address the part played by organizations in the enactment of large-scale violence, and focus on the ways in which the resulting histories come to be written. Drawing on the case of Ireland's industrial schools, I demonstrate how such accounts can act to serve the interests of those in power, effectively silencing and marginalizing weaker people. A theoretical lens that draws on ideas from Walter Benjamin and Judith Butler is helpful in understanding this; the concept of 'affective disruption' enables an exploration of how people's experiences of organizational violence can be reclaimed from the past, and protected in a continuous remembrance. Overall, this paper contributes a new perspective on the writing of organizational histories, particularly in relation to the enactment of violence. 
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-22
Number of pages13
JournalManagement and Organizational History
Volume8
Issue number1
Early online date19 Feb 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Disruption
Ireland
Affective
Walter Benjamin
History
Enactment
Judith Butler
Remembrance
History Writing

Cite this

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Affective disruption: Walter Benjamin and the 'history' of Ireland's industrial schools. / Kenny, K.

In: Management and Organizational History, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2013, p. 10-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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