Alcoholic beverage preference and diabetes incidence across Europe the Consortium on Health and Ageing Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) project

Diewertje Sluik, N. Jankovic, M G O'Doherty, Ben Schöttker, Wojciech Drygas, Olov Rolandsson, Satu Männistö, José Manuèl Ordóñez-Mena, J. Ferrieres, Christina Bamia, Giovanni de Gaetano, Jessica C Kiefte-de Jong, Oscar H Franco, I Sluijs, A M W Spijkerman, S. Sans, S. Eriksson, D. Kromhout, Antonia Trichopoulou, Tom WilsgaardH Brenner, K. Kuulasmaa, Tiina Laatikainen, Stefan Söderberg, Licia Iacoviello, P. Boffetta, F Kee, Edith J M Feskens

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Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

 It is unknown if wine, beer and spirit intake lead to a similar association with diabetes. We studied the association between alcoholic beverage preference and type 2 diabetes incidence in persons who reported to consume alcohol.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

 Ten European cohort studies from the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States were included, comprising participant data of 62 458 adults who reported alcohol consumption at baseline. Diabetes incidence was based on documented and/or self-reported diagnosis during follow-up. Preference was defined when ⩾70% of total alcohol consumed was either beer, wine or spirits. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were computed using Cox proportional hazard regression. Single-cohort HRs were pooled by random-effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS

 Beer, wine or spirit preference was not related to diabetes risk compared with having no preference. The pooled HRs were HR 1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.93, 1.20) for beer, HR 0.99 (95% CI 0.88, 1.11) for wine, and HR 1.19 (95% CI 0.97, 1.46) for spirit preference. Absolute wine intake, adjusted for total alcohol, was associated with a lower diabetes risk: pooled HR per 6 g/day was 0.96 (95% CI 0.93, 0.99). A spirit preference was related to a higher diabetes risk in those with a higher body mass index, in men and women separately, but not after excluding persons with prevalent diseases.

CONCLUSIONs

 This large individual-level meta-analysis among persons who reported alcohol consumption revealed that the preference for beer, wine, and spirits was similarly associated with diabetes incidence compared with having no preference.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-668
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume71
Issue number5
Early online date22 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 22 Feb 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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