An anthropometric history of the World, 1810-1980: did migration and globalization influence country trends?

Jörg Baten, Matthias Blum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We find that regional height levels around the world were fairly uniform throughout most of the 19th century, with two exceptions: above-average levels in Anglo-Saxon settlement regions and below-average levels in Southeast Asia. After 1880, substantial diver- gences began to differentiate other regions -- making the world population taller, but more unequal. During the late 19th century and 20th century, heights between world regions devi- ated significantly, when incomes also became very unequal. Interestingly, during the “breaking point period” between the two regimes, heights declined significantly in the cattle-rich New World countries, whereas they started to increase in Old Europe. We discuss in this study whether immigration was a core factor to influence the height decline in the “Anthropometric Decline of the Cowboy and Gaucho Empires”.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
JournalJournal of Anthropological Sciences
Volume90
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • Anthropometry, migration, height, economic history

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

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