An audit comparing current smoking cessation advice to the british thoracic society smoking cessation guidelines in patients with COPD

J. Kapur*, J. S. Elborn, L. Heaney, Donna Fitzsimons

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. Smoking cessation is the only disease modifying intervention, yet little research has involved this population. An Audit was carried out to assess how current advice given by medical officers deviates from the national guidelines during a routine out-patient visit and to gain an insight into patients current smoking habits and perceived needs. Current smokers (n=50) with COPD were contacted by telephone following their attendance. The patients had a mean pack history of 30ys and 10(2056) scored moderate-high on the Fagerstrom Nicotine Addiction Scale (1991). Although 42(84%) were advised to stop, only 31 (62%) had the health benefits explained and 3 (656) received leaflets. Nicotine Replacement Therapy was mentioned to 12 (24%), despite data suggesting this population is highly addicted to nicotine. In the Stage of Change Model (Prochaska and Diclemente, 1988) 38 (76%) of patients were in the contemplation stages and 8 (16%) are preparing to stop. 13 (26%) of respondents have never attempted to stop smoking, despite 46 (92%) acknowledging the health risks involved with their behaviour. The results indicate the dissemination of the guidelines is poor at the Clinic. The Audit suggests that this population would be amenable to an alternative intervention to assist in stopping smoking.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThorax
Volume55
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
Publication statusPublished - 01 Dec 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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