An Exploratory Analysis of Voice Hearing in Chronic PTSD: Potential Associated Mechanisms

Caroline Anketell, Martin J. Dorahy*, Maria Shannon, Rhonda Elder, Geraldine Hamilton, Mary Corry, Anne MacSherry, David Curran, Bridget O'Rawe

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research investigated auditory hallucinations (AH) in a sample with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and examined dissociation and thought suppression as potential associated mechanisms. In all, 40 individuals with PTSD were assessed on the hallucinations subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and on measures of dissociation and thought suppression. Half of the sample reported AH (n = 20, 50%). Those reporting AH had higher general and pathological dissociation scores but did not differ on thought suppression or PTSD symptom severity. Results suggest that (a) AH in chronic PTSD is not a rare phenomenon, (b) dissociation is significantly related to AH, and (c) dissociation may be a potential mediating mechanism for AH in PTSD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-107
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Trauma and Dissociation
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • dissociation
  • NATIONAL COMORBIDITY SURVEY
  • SEVERITY
  • thought suppression
  • INTRUSIVE THOUGHTS
  • VALIDITY
  • THOUGHT SUPPRESSION
  • HALLUCINATIONS
  • ADOLESCENTS
  • PSYCHOTIC SYMPTOMS
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • auditory hallucinations
  • PTSD

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