An Impact of Various Shroud Bleed Slot Configurations and Cavity Vanes on Compressor Map Width and the Inducer Flow Field

Subenuka Sivagnanasundaram, Stephen Spence, Juliana Early, B. Nikpour

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes an investigation of map width enhancement and a detailed analysis of the inducer flow field due to various bleed slot configurations and vanes in the annular cavity of a turbocharger centrifugal compressor. The compressor under investigation is used in a turbocharger application for a heavy duty diesel engine of approximately 400hp. This investigation has been undertaken using a CFD model of the full compressor stage which includes a manual multi-block structured grid generation method. The influence of the bleed slot flow on the inducer flow field at a range of operating conditions has been analysed, highlighting the improvement in surge and choked flow capability. The impact of the bleed slot geometry variations and the inclusion of cavity vanes on the inlet incidence angle have been studied in detail by considering the swirl component introduced at the leading edge by the recirculating flow through the slot. Further, the overall stage efficiency and the non-uniform flow field at the inducer inlet have been also analysed. The analysis revealed that increasing the slot width has increased the map width by about 17%. However, it has a small impact on the efficiency due to the frictional and mixing losses. Moreover, adding vanes in the cavity improved the pressure ratio and compressor performance noticeably. A detail analysis of the compressor with cavity vanes has also been presented.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the ASME 2011 Turbo Expo: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition
Pages2009
Number of pages2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2011

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