An Inclusive Design Dialogue on Ethics and Aesthetics

Ruth Morrow, Kathryn Moore

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    170 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    One of the many definitions of inclusive design is that it is a user-led approach to design. To date its focus has been on ‘critical’ users, in particular disabled people. As such, there is pressure to design environments that meet the often urgent and complex demands of these users. Designers, uncertain of their knowledge, rely heavily on user input and guidance, often resulting in designs that are ‘solution’ driven (rather than solution seeking) and short term; users focus on what they need, not what they might need. This paper argues that design needs to reclaim an equal presence within inclusive design. It proposes that the ‘weakness’ of design lies in the uneasy and at times conflicting relationship between ethics and aesthetics. The paper itself is constructed around a dialogue between two academics, one concerned with critical user needs, the other with aesthetics, but both directed towards the support of design quality
    Original languageEnglish
    Number of pages5
    Publication statusPublished - 01 Oct 2004
    EventOpen Space - People Space An International Conference on Inclusive Environments - The Hub, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
    Duration: 27 Oct 200429 Oct 2004

    Conference

    ConferenceOpen Space - People Space An International Conference on Inclusive Environments
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityEdinburgh
    Period27/10/200429/10/2004

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'An Inclusive Design Dialogue on Ethics and Aesthetics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this