An RCT of atraumatic restorative treatment for older adults: 5 year results

C Da Mata, G McKenna, L Anwigi, M Hayes, N Woods, D. O'Mahony, PF Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:
to compare the survival of ART and a conventional restorative technique (CT) for restoring carious lesions in older adults after 5 years.
METHODS:
In this parallel randomised controlled clinical trial, 219 independently-living adults were recruited from a dental hospital/community and a geriatric day hospital. Ninety-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria and presented with carious lesions were randomly allocated to receive either ART or conventional restorations (anaesthesia, rotary instruments and resin-modified glass ionomer). The status of restorations was assessed 6 months, 1, 2 and 5 years after restoration placement. Estimates of cumulative survival were calculated for each interval between assessments and a Cox Proportional Hazards (PH) model was fitted to the interval-censored survival time.
RESULTS:
Three hundred restorations (ART n=142; CT n=158) were placed on 99 patients, 46 males and 53 females, with a mean age of 73.2, SD: 6.8(65-90 yrs). After 5 years, ART and CT presented cumulative probability of survival of 85% and 79% (p=0.8095), respectively.
CONCLUSIONS:
ART presents survival rates comparable to a conventional technique, when treating older adults after 5 years. The ART approach could be a useful tool to provide dental care for older adults particularly in the nonclinical setting. (Trial Registration number: ISRCTN 76299321).
CLINICAL RELEVANCE:
This study shows that ART presents survival rates comparable to conventional techniques to treat carious lesions in older patients after 5 years. It is well accepted by this age cohort, and therefore could be an alternative to treat the elderly, especially those who are homebound or cannot attend the dentist.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Early online date09 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusEarly online date - 09 Mar 2019

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Survival
Survival Rate
Dental Care
Therapeutics
Dentists
Proportional Hazards Models
Geriatrics
Tooth
Anesthesia
Randomized Controlled Trials
glass ionomer

Cite this

Da Mata, C ; McKenna, G ; Anwigi, L ; Hayes, M ; Woods, N ; O'Mahony, D. ; Allen, PF. / An RCT of atraumatic restorative treatment for older adults: 5 year results. In: Journal of Dentistry. 2019.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES:to compare the survival of ART and a conventional restorative technique (CT) for restoring carious lesions in older adults after 5 years.METHODS:In this parallel randomised controlled clinical trial, 219 independently-living adults were recruited from a dental hospital/community and a geriatric day hospital. Ninety-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria and presented with carious lesions were randomly allocated to receive either ART or conventional restorations (anaesthesia, rotary instruments and resin-modified glass ionomer). The status of restorations was assessed 6 months, 1, 2 and 5 years after restoration placement. Estimates of cumulative survival were calculated for each interval between assessments and a Cox Proportional Hazards (PH) model was fitted to the interval-censored survival time.RESULTS:Three hundred restorations (ART n=142; CT n=158) were placed on 99 patients, 46 males and 53 females, with a mean age of 73.2, SD: 6.8(65-90 yrs). After 5 years, ART and CT presented cumulative probability of survival of 85{\%} and 79{\%} (p=0.8095), respectively.CONCLUSIONS:ART presents survival rates comparable to a conventional technique, when treating older adults after 5 years. The ART approach could be a useful tool to provide dental care for older adults particularly in the nonclinical setting. (Trial Registration number: ISRCTN 76299321).CLINICAL RELEVANCE:This study shows that ART presents survival rates comparable to conventional techniques to treat carious lesions in older patients after 5 years. It is well accepted by this age cohort, and therefore could be an alternative to treat the elderly, especially those who are homebound or cannot attend the dentist.",
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An RCT of atraumatic restorative treatment for older adults: 5 year results. / Da Mata, C ; McKenna, G; Anwigi, L; Hayes, M; Woods, N; O'Mahony, D.; Allen, PF.

In: Journal of Dentistry, 09.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - An RCT of atraumatic restorative treatment for older adults: 5 year results

AU - Da Mata, C

AU - McKenna, G

AU - Anwigi, L

AU - Hayes, M

AU - Woods, N

AU - O'Mahony, D.

AU - Allen, PF

PY - 2019/3/9

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N2 - OBJECTIVES:to compare the survival of ART and a conventional restorative technique (CT) for restoring carious lesions in older adults after 5 years.METHODS:In this parallel randomised controlled clinical trial, 219 independently-living adults were recruited from a dental hospital/community and a geriatric day hospital. Ninety-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria and presented with carious lesions were randomly allocated to receive either ART or conventional restorations (anaesthesia, rotary instruments and resin-modified glass ionomer). The status of restorations was assessed 6 months, 1, 2 and 5 years after restoration placement. Estimates of cumulative survival were calculated for each interval between assessments and a Cox Proportional Hazards (PH) model was fitted to the interval-censored survival time.RESULTS:Three hundred restorations (ART n=142; CT n=158) were placed on 99 patients, 46 males and 53 females, with a mean age of 73.2, SD: 6.8(65-90 yrs). After 5 years, ART and CT presented cumulative probability of survival of 85% and 79% (p=0.8095), respectively.CONCLUSIONS:ART presents survival rates comparable to a conventional technique, when treating older adults after 5 years. The ART approach could be a useful tool to provide dental care for older adults particularly in the nonclinical setting. (Trial Registration number: ISRCTN 76299321).CLINICAL RELEVANCE:This study shows that ART presents survival rates comparable to conventional techniques to treat carious lesions in older patients after 5 years. It is well accepted by this age cohort, and therefore could be an alternative to treat the elderly, especially those who are homebound or cannot attend the dentist.

AB - OBJECTIVES:to compare the survival of ART and a conventional restorative technique (CT) for restoring carious lesions in older adults after 5 years.METHODS:In this parallel randomised controlled clinical trial, 219 independently-living adults were recruited from a dental hospital/community and a geriatric day hospital. Ninety-nine patients who met the inclusion criteria and presented with carious lesions were randomly allocated to receive either ART or conventional restorations (anaesthesia, rotary instruments and resin-modified glass ionomer). The status of restorations was assessed 6 months, 1, 2 and 5 years after restoration placement. Estimates of cumulative survival were calculated for each interval between assessments and a Cox Proportional Hazards (PH) model was fitted to the interval-censored survival time.RESULTS:Three hundred restorations (ART n=142; CT n=158) were placed on 99 patients, 46 males and 53 females, with a mean age of 73.2, SD: 6.8(65-90 yrs). After 5 years, ART and CT presented cumulative probability of survival of 85% and 79% (p=0.8095), respectively.CONCLUSIONS:ART presents survival rates comparable to a conventional technique, when treating older adults after 5 years. The ART approach could be a useful tool to provide dental care for older adults particularly in the nonclinical setting. (Trial Registration number: ISRCTN 76299321).CLINICAL RELEVANCE:This study shows that ART presents survival rates comparable to conventional techniques to treat carious lesions in older patients after 5 years. It is well accepted by this age cohort, and therefore could be an alternative to treat the elderly, especially those who are homebound or cannot attend the dentist.

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JO - Journal of Dentistry

JF - Journal of Dentistry

SN - 0300-5712

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