Analysis of European case-control studies suggests that common inherited variation in mitochondrial DNA is not involved in susceptibility to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Catherine J.E. Ingram, Michael E. Weale, Christopher A. Plaster, Karen E. Morrison, Emily F. Goodall, Hardev S. Pall, Marcus Beck, Sibylle Jablonka, Michael Sendtner, Elizabeth M.C. Fisher, Neil Bradman, Dalia Kasperavičiūtė

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While some cases of familial ALS can be entirely attributed to known inherited variation, the majority (?90%) are sporadic, where the cause(s) are not entirely understood. Both genetic and environmental factors may contribute to susceptibility. Mitochondrial damage, a common feature of neurodegenerative disease, is observed in most patients and inherited polymorphism in the mitochondrial genome has been suggested as a contributing factor. We used an economic and efficient method to test whether such involvement is probable. We genotyped 22 mtDNA coding region SNPs and sequenced the mtDNA hypervariable region 1 to determine the position of each mitochondrial genome within the genealogy of mitochondrial haplotypes in samples of ALS patients (n =?700) and controls (n =?462) from two European populations. We compared haplotype and haplogroup distribution in cases and controls drawn from the same populations. No statistical difference was observed between cases and controls at either the haplogroup or haplotype level (p = ??0.2). In conclusion, it is unlikely that common, shared genetic variants in the mitochondrial genome contribute substantially to ALS. Combining the data with other studies will allow meta-analysis to look for variants with modest effect sizes. The sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes will be required to assess the role of rare mutations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)341-346
Number of pages6
JournalAmyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Mar 2012

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