Arsenic and selenium mobilisation from organic matter treated mine spoil with and without inorganic fertilisation

Eduardo Moreno-Jiménez, Rafael Clemente, Adrien Mestrot, Andrew A. Meharg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Organic matter amendments are applied to contaminated soil to provide a better habitat for revegetation and remediation, and olive mill waste compost (OMWC) has been described as a promising material for this aim. We report here the results of an incubation experiment carried out in flooded conditions to study its influence in As and metal solubility in a trace elements contaminated soil. NPK fertilisation and especially organic amendment application resulted in increased As, Se and Cu concentrations in pore water. Independent of the amendment, dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) was the most abundant As species in solution. The application of OMWC increased pore water dissolved organic-carbon (DOC) concentrations, which may explain the observed mobilisation of As, Cu and Se; phosphate added in NPK could also be in part responsible of the mobilisation caused in As. Therefore, the application of soil amendments in mine soils may be particularly problematic in flooded systems. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-244
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume173
Issue numbernull
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • SPAIN
  • Pore water
  • Metals
  • GEOCHEMISTRY
  • AMENDMENTS
  • Biogeochemical cycles
  • COMPOST
  • MOBILITY
  • TRACE-ELEMENT SOLUBILITY
  • Arsenic speciation
  • CONTAMINATED SOIL
  • Air trapping
  • TOXICITY
  • BY-PRODUCT
  • ALPERUJO

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

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