Arsenic speciation in Chinese Herbal Medicines and human health implications for inorganic arsenic

Xiao-Juan Liu, Quan-Li Zhao, Guo-Xin Sun, Paul Williams, Xiu-Jun Lu, Jing-Zhu Cai, Wen-Ju Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rice and drinking water are recognized as the dominant sources of arsenic (As) for human intake, while little is known about As accumulation and speciation in Chinese Herbal Medicines (CHMs), which have been available for many hundreds of years for the treatment of diseases in both eastern and western cultures. Inorganic arsenic was the predominant species in all of CHMs samples. The levels of inorganic arsenic in CHMs from fields and markets or pharmacies ranged from 63 to 550 ng/g with a mean of 208 ng/g and 94 to 8683 ng/g with a mean of 1092 ng/g, respectively. The highest concentration was found in the Chrysanthemum from pharmacies. It indicates that the risk of inorganic As in CHMs to human health is higher in medicines from markets or pharmacies than that collected directly from fields. Some CHMs may make a considerable contribution to the human intake of inorganic arsenic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-154
JournalEnvironmental Pollution
Volume172
Early online date09 Oct 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology

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