Arsenic(III,V) adsorption onto charred dolomite: charring optimization and batch studies

Yousef Salameh, Ahmad B. Albadarin*, Stephen Allen, Gavin Walker, M. N. M. Ahmad

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this work, the removal of arsenic from aqueous solutions onto thermally processed dolomite is investigated. The dolomite was thermally processed (charred) at temperatures of 600, 700 and 800 degrees C for 1, 2, 4 and 8 h. Isotherm experiments were carried out on these samples over a wide pH range. A complete arsenic removal was achieved over the pH range studied when using the 800 degrees C charred dolomite. However, at this temperature, thermal degradation of the dolomite weakens its structure due to the decomposition of the magnesium carbonate, leading to a partial dissolution. For this reason, the dolomitic sorbent chosen for further investigations was the 8 h at 700 degrees C material. Isotherm studies indicated that the Langmuir model was successful in describing the process to a better extent than the Freundlich model for the As(V) adsorption on the selected charred dolomite. However, for the As(III) adsorption, the Freundlich model was more successful in describing the process. The maximum adsorption capacities of charred dolomite for arsenite and arsenate ions are 1.846 and 2.157 mg/g, respectively. It was found that both the pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models are able to describe the experimental data (R-2 > 0.980). The data suggest the charring process allows dissociation of the dolomite to calcium carbonate and magnesium oxide, which accelerates the process of arsenic oxide and arsenic carbonate precipitation. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)663-671
Number of pages9
JournalChemical Engineering Journal
Volume259
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Arsenite and arsenate
  • Charred dolomite
  • Adsorption
  • Ground-water
  • AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS
  • CALCINED DOLOMITE
  • ACTIVATED CARBONS
  • REMOVAL
  • SORPTION
  • SORBENTS
  • EQUILIBRIUM
  • GROUNDWATER
  • POROSITY
  • ISOTHERM

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