Ash from Changbaishan Millennium eruption recorded in Greenland ice: Implications for determining the eruption's timing and impact

Chunqing Sun, Gill Plunkett, Jiaqi Liu, Hongli Zhao, Michael Sigl, Joseph R. McConnell, Jonathan R. Pilcher, Bo Vinther, J.P. Steffensen, Valerie Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Citations (Scopus)
415 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Major volcanic eruptions can impact on global climate by injecting large quantities of aerosols and ash into the atmosphere that alter the radiative balance and chemical equilibrium of the stratosphere. The Millennium eruption of Tianchi (Paektu), China/North Korea, was one of the largest Late Holocene eruptions. Uncertainty about the precise timing of the eruption has hindered the recognition of its climate impact in palaeoclimate and historical records. Here we report the compelling identification of the eruption's volcanic signal in Greenland ice cores through the association of geochemically-characterized volcanic glass, represented in by bimodal populations that compare with proximal material from the source eruption. The eruption most probably occurred in the AD 940?s, seven years after the Eldgjá eruption on Iceland. We examine the eruption's potential for climate forcing using the sulfate records from the ice-cores and conclude that it was unlikely to have had a global or extra-regional impact.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)694-701
Number of pages8
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume41
Issue number2
Early online date29 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Tianchi, Changbaishan
  • Millennium Eruption
  • Eldgja eruption
  • volcanic impact
  • tephra
  • Greenland ice cores

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Geophysics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Ash from Changbaishan Millennium eruption recorded in Greenland ice: Implications for determining the eruption's timing and impact'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this