Attachment Style in Adults who Failed to Thrive as Children: Outcomes of a 20 Year Follow-up Study of Factors Influencing Maintenance or Change in Attachment Style

Dorota Iwaniec, Helga Sneddon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A group of children identified as non-organic failure-to-thrive between 1977 and 1980 were investigated, assessed and provided with social work intervention and treatment. Those children and their families have been followed up for the last 20 years. The current paper examines the stability of an internal working model in a sample of individuals who had failed to thrive as children, by comparing each individual's adult attachment style with their childhood attachment to their mother. In this sample, several cases showed changes from insecure to secure attachment styles. Possible reasons are discussed for positive and negative changes, as well as cases when there was no change in attachment style. These include the effectiveness of intervention in addition to changes in life circumstances. The findings suggest that when appropriate support and intervention is provided, or when different circumstances or relationships are experienced, internal working models can change.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)179-195
    Number of pages17
    JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
    Volume31(2)
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2001

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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