Auditory sensory memory and working memory processes in children with normal hearing and cochlear implants.

David Watson, J. Titterington, A. Henry, J.G. Toner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There can be wide variation in the level of oral/aural language ability that prelingually hearing-impaired children develop after cochlear implantation. Automatic perceptual processing mechanisms have come under increasing scrutiny in attempts to explain this variation. Using mismatch negativity methods, this study explored associations between auditory sensory memory mechanisms and verbal working memory function in children with cochlear implants and a group of hearing controls of similar age. Whilst clear relationships were observed in the hearing children between mismatch activation and working memory measures, this association appeared to be disrupted in the implant children. These findings would fit with the proposal that early auditory deprivation and a degraded auditory signal can cause changes in the processes underpinning the development of oral/aural language skills in prelingually hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and thus alter their developmental trajectory
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-76
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Audiology and NeuroOtology
Volume12
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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