Augmentation mammoplasty: effect on diagnosis of breast cancer

S. A. McIntosh, K. Horgan*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Breast augmentation for cosmetic purposes is an increasingly common procedure in the USA and UK. In the USA in 2003, a total of 254 140 breast augmentation procedures were carried out [American Society of Plastic Surgeons, http://www.plasticsurgery.org/newsroom/ Procedural-Statistics-Press-Kit-Index.cfm9-1-2005; 2006.(1)]. It has been previously estimated that between 1 and 1.5 million women in the USA have prosthetic breast implants [Cook RR, Delongchamp RR, Woodbury M, et at. The prevalence of women with breast implants in the United States, 1989. J Clin Epidemiol 1995;48:519-25.(2)]. The UK National Breast Implant Registry has recorded a rise in the numbers of women receiving breast implants, with over 13 000 procedures registered in 2001; an estimated 77% of these were for cosmetic purposes. No association has been found between the presence of breast implants in a breast and an increased risk of breast cancer, and this subject has been comprehensively reviewed elsewhere [Hoshaw SJ, Klein PJ, Clark BD, et al. Breast implants and cancer: causation, delayed detection, and survival. Plast Reconstr Surg 2001; 107:1393-407.(3)]. However, as the population of women with breast implants ages, an increasing number of them will develop breast cancer; a reflection of the fact that the incidence of the disease increases with increasing age. Debate continues on the effect of breast implants on the efficacy of mammography in diagnosing breast cancer, and the role of other imaging techniques for this purpose, as well as the limitations that the presence of implants place on percutaneous biopsy techniques. We review the Literature on the radiological and tissue diagnosis of breast cancer in women with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty. (c) 2007 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-129
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery
Volume61
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • breast augmentation
  • breast cancer
  • breast imaging
  • tissue diagnosis
  • FINE-NEEDLE-ASPIRATION
  • SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY
  • SONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS
  • MAGNETIC-RESONANCE
  • COMPLICATION RATES
  • IMPLANT RUPTURE
  • CORE BIOPSY
  • PROSTHESES
  • ACCURACY
  • LESIONS

Cite this

@article{bbaea9498db243f69043d892a45192f0,
title = "Augmentation mammoplasty: effect on diagnosis of breast cancer",
abstract = "Breast augmentation for cosmetic purposes is an increasingly common procedure in the USA and UK. In the USA in 2003, a total of 254 140 breast augmentation procedures were carried out [American Society of Plastic Surgeons, http://www.plasticsurgery.org/newsroom/ Procedural-Statistics-Press-Kit-Index.cfm9-1-2005; 2006.(1)]. It has been previously estimated that between 1 and 1.5 million women in the USA have prosthetic breast implants [Cook RR, Delongchamp RR, Woodbury M, et at. The prevalence of women with breast implants in the United States, 1989. J Clin Epidemiol 1995;48:519-25.(2)]. The UK National Breast Implant Registry has recorded a rise in the numbers of women receiving breast implants, with over 13 000 procedures registered in 2001; an estimated 77{\%} of these were for cosmetic purposes. No association has been found between the presence of breast implants in a breast and an increased risk of breast cancer, and this subject has been comprehensively reviewed elsewhere [Hoshaw SJ, Klein PJ, Clark BD, et al. Breast implants and cancer: causation, delayed detection, and survival. Plast Reconstr Surg 2001; 107:1393-407.(3)]. However, as the population of women with breast implants ages, an increasing number of them will develop breast cancer; a reflection of the fact that the incidence of the disease increases with increasing age. Debate continues on the effect of breast implants on the efficacy of mammography in diagnosing breast cancer, and the role of other imaging techniques for this purpose, as well as the limitations that the presence of implants place on percutaneous biopsy techniques. We review the Literature on the radiological and tissue diagnosis of breast cancer in women with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty. (c) 2007 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "breast augmentation, breast cancer, breast imaging, tissue diagnosis, FINE-NEEDLE-ASPIRATION, SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY, SONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS, MAGNETIC-RESONANCE, COMPLICATION RATES, IMPLANT RUPTURE, CORE BIOPSY, PROSTHESES, ACCURACY, LESIONS",
author = "McIntosh, {S. A.} and K. Horgan",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1016/j.bjps.2007.06.035",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "124--129",
journal = "Journal of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery",
issn = "1748-6815",
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number = "2",

}

Augmentation mammoplasty: effect on diagnosis of breast cancer. / McIntosh, S. A.; Horgan, K.

In: Journal of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, Vol. 61, No. 2, 2008, p. 124-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalLiterature review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Augmentation mammoplasty: effect on diagnosis of breast cancer

AU - McIntosh, S. A.

AU - Horgan, K.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Breast augmentation for cosmetic purposes is an increasingly common procedure in the USA and UK. In the USA in 2003, a total of 254 140 breast augmentation procedures were carried out [American Society of Plastic Surgeons, http://www.plasticsurgery.org/newsroom/ Procedural-Statistics-Press-Kit-Index.cfm9-1-2005; 2006.(1)]. It has been previously estimated that between 1 and 1.5 million women in the USA have prosthetic breast implants [Cook RR, Delongchamp RR, Woodbury M, et at. The prevalence of women with breast implants in the United States, 1989. J Clin Epidemiol 1995;48:519-25.(2)]. The UK National Breast Implant Registry has recorded a rise in the numbers of women receiving breast implants, with over 13 000 procedures registered in 2001; an estimated 77% of these were for cosmetic purposes. No association has been found between the presence of breast implants in a breast and an increased risk of breast cancer, and this subject has been comprehensively reviewed elsewhere [Hoshaw SJ, Klein PJ, Clark BD, et al. Breast implants and cancer: causation, delayed detection, and survival. Plast Reconstr Surg 2001; 107:1393-407.(3)]. However, as the population of women with breast implants ages, an increasing number of them will develop breast cancer; a reflection of the fact that the incidence of the disease increases with increasing age. Debate continues on the effect of breast implants on the efficacy of mammography in diagnosing breast cancer, and the role of other imaging techniques for this purpose, as well as the limitations that the presence of implants place on percutaneous biopsy techniques. We review the Literature on the radiological and tissue diagnosis of breast cancer in women with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty. (c) 2007 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Breast augmentation for cosmetic purposes is an increasingly common procedure in the USA and UK. In the USA in 2003, a total of 254 140 breast augmentation procedures were carried out [American Society of Plastic Surgeons, http://www.plasticsurgery.org/newsroom/ Procedural-Statistics-Press-Kit-Index.cfm9-1-2005; 2006.(1)]. It has been previously estimated that between 1 and 1.5 million women in the USA have prosthetic breast implants [Cook RR, Delongchamp RR, Woodbury M, et at. The prevalence of women with breast implants in the United States, 1989. J Clin Epidemiol 1995;48:519-25.(2)]. The UK National Breast Implant Registry has recorded a rise in the numbers of women receiving breast implants, with over 13 000 procedures registered in 2001; an estimated 77% of these were for cosmetic purposes. No association has been found between the presence of breast implants in a breast and an increased risk of breast cancer, and this subject has been comprehensively reviewed elsewhere [Hoshaw SJ, Klein PJ, Clark BD, et al. Breast implants and cancer: causation, delayed detection, and survival. Plast Reconstr Surg 2001; 107:1393-407.(3)]. However, as the population of women with breast implants ages, an increasing number of them will develop breast cancer; a reflection of the fact that the incidence of the disease increases with increasing age. Debate continues on the effect of breast implants on the efficacy of mammography in diagnosing breast cancer, and the role of other imaging techniques for this purpose, as well as the limitations that the presence of implants place on percutaneous biopsy techniques. We review the Literature on the radiological and tissue diagnosis of breast cancer in women with a history of previous augmentation mammaplasty. (c) 2007 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - breast augmentation

KW - breast cancer

KW - breast imaging

KW - tissue diagnosis

KW - FINE-NEEDLE-ASPIRATION

KW - SCREENING MAMMOGRAPHY

KW - SONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS

KW - MAGNETIC-RESONANCE

KW - COMPLICATION RATES

KW - IMPLANT RUPTURE

KW - CORE BIOPSY

KW - PROSTHESES

KW - ACCURACY

KW - LESIONS

U2 - 10.1016/j.bjps.2007.06.035

DO - 10.1016/j.bjps.2007.06.035

M3 - Literature review

VL - 61

SP - 124

EP - 129

JO - Journal of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery

JF - Journal of plastic reconstructive and aesthetic surgery

SN - 1748-6815

IS - 2

ER -