Availability of complementary and alternative medicine for people with cancer in the British National Health Service: Results of a national survey

B. Egan, H. Gage, J. Hood, K. Poole, C. McDowell, G. Maguire, Lesley Storey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study assessed access to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies for people with cancer within the British National Health Service. CAM units were identified through an internet search in 2009. A total of 142 units, providing 62 different therapies, were identified: 105 (74.0%) England; 23 (16.2%) Scotland; 7 (4.9%) each in Wales and Northern Ireland. Most units provide a small number of therapies (median 4, range 1–20), and focus on complementary, rather than alternative approaches. Counselling is the most widely provided therapy (available at 82.4% of identified units), followed by reflexology (62.0%), aromatherapy (59.1%), reiki (43.0%), massage (42.2%). CAM units per million of the population varied between countries (England: 2.2; Wales: 2.3; Scotland: 4.8; Northern Ireland: 5.0), and within countries. Better publicity for CAM units, greater integration of units in conventional cancer treatment centres may help improve access to CAMs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-80
Number of pages6
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2012

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State Medicine
Complementary Therapies
Neoplasms
Northern Ireland
Massage
Wales
Scotland
England
Therapeutic Touch
Aromatherapy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics
Internet
Counseling

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Egan, B. ; Gage, H. ; Hood, J. ; Poole, K. ; McDowell, C. ; Maguire, G. ; Storey, Lesley. / Availability of complementary and alternative medicine for people with cancer in the British National Health Service: Results of a national survey. In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 2. pp. 75-80.
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Availability of complementary and alternative medicine for people with cancer in the British National Health Service: Results of a national survey. / Egan, B. ; Gage, H.; Hood, J.; Poole, K.; McDowell, C.; Maguire, G.; Storey, Lesley.

In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Vol. 18, No. 2, 05.2012, p. 75-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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