Bacterium consortium drives compost stability and degradation of organic contaminants in in-vessel composting process of the mechanically separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MS-OFMSW)

Jessica Graça, Brian Murphy, Prasanna Pentlavalli, Christopher C.R. Allen, Eoin Bird, Michael Gaffney, Tim Duggan, Brian Kelleher*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Commercial composting of the mechanically separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MS-OFMSW) is employed to stabilize municipal organic waste. Its feasibility is linked to process efficacy and compost stability. Threshold values for stability are imposed by regulatory frameworks. Limited reuse options exist for this material often due to the presence of organic pollutants. The optimisation of the composting process is required to reach stability in a viable timeframe. We evaluated the effects on compost stability and the degradation of organic contaminates by using wood shavings as a bulking agent and increasing the turning frequency in a pilot scale process. The use of wood shavings decreased the time required for compost stability while turning frequency had no impact. The addition of wood shavings to the initial feedstock stimulated microbial activity that in turn decreased the time to compost stability and enhanced the degradation of detected PAHs and short-chain phthalates.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100621
Number of pages10
JournalBioresource Technology Reports
Volume13
Early online date06 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was funded by the Irish Environmental Protection Agency , Southern Waste Region ( 2018-RE-MS-15 ) and Enterprise Ireland ( IP 2014 0292 ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Author(s)

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Bacterial community
  • BSRW
  • Compost stability
  • MS-OFMSW
  • PAHs
  • Phthalates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal

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