Basalt Fibre Reinforced Polymer Strengthening of Normal Strength Reinforced Concrete Floor Slabs Subject to Arching Effects

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

With ever increasing demands to strengthen existing reinforced concrete structures to facilitate higher loading due to change of use and to extend service lifetime, the use of fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) in structural retrofitting offers an opportunity to achieve these aims. To date, most research in this area has focussed on the use of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP), with relatively little on the use of basalt fibre reinforced polymer (BFRP) as a suitable strengthening material. In addition, most previous research has been carried out using simply supported elements, which have not considered the beneficial influence of in-plane lateral restraint, as experienced within a framed building structure. Furthermore, by installing FRPs using the near surface mounted (NSM) technique, disturbance to the existing structure can be minimised.
This paper outlines BFRP NSM strengthening of one third scale laterally restrained floor slabs which reflect the inherent insitu compressive membrane action (CMA) in such slabs. The span-to-depth ratios of the test slabs were 20 and 15 and all were constructed with normal strength concrete (~40N/mm2) and 0.15% steel reinforcement. 0.10% BFRP was used in the retrofitted samples, which were compared with unretrofitted control samples. In addition, the bond strength of BFRP bars bonded into concrete was investigated over a range of bond lengths with two different adhesive thicknesses. This involved using an articulated beam arrangement in order to establish optimum bond characteristics for use in strengthening slab samples.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 01 Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Concrete
  • Arching
  • Basalt FRP, concrete

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