Best practices and current implementation of emerging smartphone-based (bio)sensors - Part 2: Development, validation, and social impact

A. Geballa-Koukoula, G.M.S. Ross, A. J. Bosman, Y. Zhao, H. Zhou, M.W.F. Nielen, K. Rafferty, C. T. Elliott, G. IJ Salentijn*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
94 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The amalgamation of computer-like capabilities and portability of modern smartphones has fuelled their implementation as detectors and interfaces in emerging smartphone-based (bio)sensors (SbSs) for e.g. healthcare, point-of-need, food safety, environmental science, and forensics systems. SbSs intrinsically carry great potential for consumer diagnostics, and future ‘citizen science’ approaches, which have far-reaching implications for the technological, legal, and ethical aspects associated with the research, development, and deployment of SbSs. In this review (part 2 of a pair of review papers), we evaluated the pertinent literature on issues concerning the development and validation of SbSs, and we address their potential social impact. Finally, insights gleaned are combined in a set of recommendations to guide future ethical, sustainable, and efficient research, development, and deployment of SbSs.

Original languageEnglish
Article number116986
JournalTrAC - Trends in Analytical Chemistry
Volume161
Early online date02 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie gran agreement No. 770325 (FoodSmartphone).

Funding Information:
The European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No. 101016444 and is part of the PHOTONICS PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP (PhotonFood).

Funding Information:
The increased use of smartphones is also evident in limited resource settings. For instance, in Sub-Saharan Africa, 55% of the population uses smartphones [164]. For this reason, SbS applications have increased potential for positive SI in low-resource or rural settings where SbSs can increase the accessibility to analysis that is otherwise restricted to centralized laboratories. ‘Mobile health’ or ‘mHealth’ (53/886) applications, are healthcare practices/applications performed by using mobile devices and are supported by the WHO. As such, mHealth applications carry a significant SI, providing access to healthcare for the least privileged through guided self-testing, long-term monitoring, and real-time reporting of results to clinicians, enabling rapid response in overwhelmed health care services [131].The European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie gran agreement No. 770325 (FoodSmartphone).The European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No. 101016444 and is part of the PHOTONICS PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP (PhotonFood).Funding and support from the Key Laboratory of Intelligent Preventive Medicine of Zhejiang Province (2020E10004).The Bualuang ASEAN Chair Professor Fund.

Funding Information:
The authors would like to acknowledge funding from:

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors

Keywords

  • Consumer-operable devices
  • R&D
  • Social impact
  • Sustainability
  • Validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy

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