Bring Your Own Devices classroom: Exploring the issue of digital divide in the teaching and learning contexts

Janak Adhikari*, Anuradha Mathrani, Chris Scogings

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: Over the past few years, technology-mediated learning has established itself as a valuable pathway towards learners’ academic and social development. However, within the adoption stages of information and communications technology-enabled education, further questions have been raised in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the past three years, the authors have been working with one of the earliest secondary schools in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. In this paper, the authors present the findings of a longitudinal investigation into the BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome. Design/methodology/approach: This study is an empirically grounded longitudinal case research conducted over a three-year period in one secondary school in New Zealand. This research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations, to gather qualitative data from various stakeholders (teachers, students and parents). Findings: The findings from the study of the BYOD project inform of digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across formal and informal spaces. The authors explored how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome. The result sheds light on key issues affecting the learning process to contextualise factors in the three-level digital divide for the BYOD technology adoption process in classroom settings. Research limitations/implications: The study presents findings from an ongoing investigation of one secondary school, an early adopter of the BYOD policy. While the authors have followed the school for three years, more in-depth studies on how teaching and learning practices are evolving across formal and informal spaces will be further qualified in the next stages of data collection. Originality/value: The study contributes to new knowledge on how digital inclusion can be supported beyond mere access to meaningful use of technology to reinforce student learning and their overall skill development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-343
Number of pages21
JournalInteractive Technology and Smart Education
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • BYOD classrooms
  • Digital divide
  • Digital divide in learning
  • Formal and informal learning contexts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Bring Your Own Devices classroom: Exploring the issue of digital divide in the teaching and learning contexts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this