Bystander Signalling: Exploring Clinical Relevance Through New Approaches and New Models

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Abstract

Classical radiation biology research has centred on nuclear DNA as the main target of radiation-induced damage. Over the past two decades, this has been challenged by a significant amount of scientific evidence clearly showing radiation-induced cell signalling effects to have important roles in mediating overall radiobiological response. These effects, generally termed radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBEs) have challenged the traditional DNA targeted theory in radiation biology and highlighted an important role for cells not directly traversed by radiation. The multiplicity of experimental systems and exposure conditions in which RIBEs have been observed has hindered precise definitions of these effects. However, RIBEs have recently been classified for different relevant human radiation exposure scenarios in an attempt to clarify their role in vivo. Despite significant research efforts in this area, there is little direct evidence for their role in clinically relevant exposure scenarios. In this review, we explore the clinical relevance of RIBEs from classical experimental approaches through to novel models that have been used to further determine their potential implications in the clinic. 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)586-592
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Oncology
Volume25
Issue number10
Early online date10 Jul 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2013 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Bystander effect
  • in vivo
  • ionising radiation
  • microbeam
  • SISTER-CHROMATID EXCHANGES
  • RAT LUNG IRRADIATION
  • EARLY DNA-DAMAGE
  • EFFECTS IN-VIVO
  • ALPHA-PARTICLES
  • IONIZING-RADIATION
  • MICROBEAM IRRADIATION
  • TARGETED IRRADIATION
  • UNIRRADIATED CELLS
  • RAINBOW-TROUT

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