Can organizational justice mitigate the negative effects of shift work and fixed-term employment?

Tarja Heponiemi, Marko Elovainio, Anne Kouvonen, Anja Noro, Harriet Finne-Soveri, Timo Sinervo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined whether organizational justice moderates the association of shift work and employment type with patient-related stress, stress symptoms, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Cross-sectional survey data from 1270 Finnish female elderly care staff aged 18–69 years was used. Analyses of covariance were used to examine the associations adjusted for age,marital status, education, and tenure. Organizational justice was associated with lower levels of patient-related stress, stress symptoms, and musculoskeletal symptoms. Organizational justice mitigated stress symptoms related to working night shift and three shifts. In addition, organizational justice mitigated the patient-related stress associated with working on fixed-term contracts. Organizational justice was also able to alleviate musculoskeletal symptoms associated with working on permanent contracts. Thus, we found evidence for organizational justice being able to mitigate the negative effects of shift work and employment type. Promoting organizational justice in organizations with shift work and lots of fixed-term contracts is of importance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-202
JournalEuropean Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Volume22
Issue number2
Early online date14 Jun 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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