Checkpoints in the development of pathogenic and regulatory T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-A basis for current and future interventions in MS

Denise C. Fitzgerald*, Stephen M. Anderton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Given the relative inaccessibility of the target tissue - the Central Nervous System (CNS) - to experimental exploration, a wide range of in vivo experimental models are employed to study multiple sclerosis (MS), each of which affords particular suitability to studying different aspects of the disease. Individual models exhibit similarities to different types of histopathological lesions (type I-IV) described in MS. Most commonly, rodent models are used with mice being the most frequent choice, due in part to the range of reagents and genetically modified (GM) lines available as well as the reduced cost and breeding time of this species compared to larger mammals. While this chapter will primarily focus on the range of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, it is important to summarise other approaches taken to model CNS demyelination. Aside of EAE, which will be discussed in detail later, three other main categories of models are frequently used: toxin-induced demyelination, viral-induced demyelination and genetic manipulation resulting in de-/dysmyelination. These models have been reviewed in depth elsewhere.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMultiple Sclerosis Immunology
Subtitle of host publicationA Foundation for Current and Future Treatments
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages269-293
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9781461479536
ISBN (Print)1461479525, 9781461479529
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Nov 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

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